Sunday, November 19, 2017

posted by October 23, 2015

Maritime Propulsion

EMP Renewable Energy Battery Solution for Ships

A range of marine battery solutions received approval for use on-board ships or marine related applications such as offshore platforms and renewable energy projects. Available from Eco Marine Power (EMP), a developer of renewable energy solutions for ships, in cooperation with storage batteries and electrical machinery manufacturer Furukawa Battery Company of Japan, the battery range has been accepted for use on classed vessels by ClassNK (Nippon Kaiji Kyokai) in addition to having been evaluated by EMP. Three main battery types from Furukawa Battery will now be used by EMP as part of its Aquarius Marine Solar Power and Aquarius MAS + Solar solution packages.
 
FC38-12: FC38-12 VRLA (Valve Regulated Lead Acid) batteries are suited for small marine solar power applications (i.e. up to around 5kWp) and can be supplied either as a battery pack set or as individual 12V units. Advantages: size and weight, suited for installation in small  (but ventilated) spaces onboard vessels.
 
FCP Series: Furukawa Cycle Power (FCP) series battery units are available in various configurations and are supplied complete with a modular design mounting rack for vibration resistance. The space saving design of the unit also reduces installation and maintenance time. FCP series batteries are ideally suited for renewable energy applications. Advantages: Long life (to  15 years) and low maintenance.
 
UB Series: The Ultra Battery (UB) series are a solution for smart grid, wind power and solar power applications both on land and on ships. UB-50-12 batteries can be supplied as individual units or as a pack for use with an EMP marine solar power solution. Advantages: Long cycle life (approximately 4500 cycles for the UB-1000) and suppression of cathode sulfation.  
www.ecomarinepower.com
 
(As published in the September 2015 edition of Maritime Reporter & Engineering News - http://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter)
Japanrenewable energy projectsmarine solar power applications
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