Sunday, January 16, 2022
Maritime Propulsion

November 29, 2021

New Battery Hybrid Tugboat Design Unveiled

MBB & RAL rendering of new ElectRA 3000-H battery hybrid tugboat design. (Image: MBB)

Master Boat Builders, Inc. (MBB), together with naval architect and marine engineering firm, Robert Allan Ltd. (RAL) announced the creation of a new battery hybrid tugboat design, the ElectRA 3000-H. This design has been developed over the past several months to suit the evolving needs of U.S. tugboat operators.

“This unique hybrid tugboat design is the result of a strong and growing working relationship between Robert Allan Ltd. and Master Boat Builders and it builds upon our recent experience constructing multiple hybrid tugboats and a battery-powered tugboat for leading maritime operators.” said Garrett Rice, President of Master Boat Builders, “With vast global experience designing many of the world’s top workboats, RAL has been a fantastic teammate for MBB on numerous innovative, modern and reliable tugboat projects for our customers across the country.”

Throughout their long-standing relationship, MBB has delivered several RAL-designed vessels, with seven RAL-designed tugboats currently under construction.

“Master Boat Builders is a key shipyard with a proven history of providing numerous high-quality, innovative vessels to a wide range of operators” said Lawren Best, Director of Design Development of Robert Allan Ltd. “We are pleased to utilize our hybrid and battery vessel experience in collaboration with MBB to bring to market this flexible de-risked battery electric hybrid design developed specifically for the requirements of U.S. operators.”

Based on a proven RAL hybrid tug design, the ElectRA 3000-H has evolved to feature up to 2000 kWh of batteries and a boosted bollard pull of 80MT. With zero emissions during loitering and low speed transits, tugboats constructed under this design will greatly reduce carbon emissions and enhance sustainable maritime operations. To ensure operators can retain the flexibility to operate continuously, the tugboat’s main engines and generators both have the ability to charge the tugboat’s batteries and when required provide a continuous bollard pull of over 65MT.