Sunday, September 22, 2019

Additive Manufacturing News

Image: Donald MacPherson/Hydrocomp

Contemporary UUV Propulsor Design

From the standpoint of vehicle propulsion physics, an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) is little different from your personal ski boat or a tanker. It shares the Vessel-Propulsor-Drive system model, which allows a Propulsor to convert Drive energy into thrust for the purpose of moving a Vessel. The basic principles of thrust equilibrium and motion are common to all three, as are the translation of rotational energy into axial thrust by the central element of the system – the…

Image: Naval Group

World First: Printed Hollow Prop Blade

French defense contractor Naval Group and French elite engineering school  Centrale Nantes have printed the first demonstrator of hollow propeller blades by metal additive manufacturing as part of the European H2020 project, RAMSSES.Naval Group, formerly known as DCNS, said that this collaborative program, funded by the European Commission, aims to reduce the environmental impact of ships.Centrale Nantes and Naval Group are taking the lead within this project on the production…

(Photo: Damen)

First Class Approved 3D Printed Ship’s Propeller Unveiled

The world’s first Class approved 3D printed ship’s propeller, the WAAMpeller, has been unveiled following rigorous testing verified by Bureau Veritas at Damen Shipyard Group’s headquarters in the Netherlands. The groundbreaking propeller is the result of collaboration between RAMLAB, Promarin, Autodesk, Bureau Veritas and Damen, who started pooling collective resources and knowledge to develop the world’s first 3D printed ship’s propeller seven months ago. Promarin provided the design of the triple-blade propeller.

(Photo: Damen)

3D Printed Ship’s Propeller Prototype Produced

A prototype of the world’s first class approved ship’s propeller manufactured using 3D printing techniques has been produced by a cooperative consortium of companies that includes Damen Shipyards Group, Rotterdam Additive Manufacturing LAB (RAMLAB), Promarin, Autodesk and Bureau Veritas. The 1,350mm diameter propeller – named WAAMpeller – was fabricated from a Nickel Aluminium Bronze (NAB) alloy at RAMLAB in the Port of Rotterdam. The propeller was produced with the Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) method using a Valk welding system and Autodesk software.

Left to right: Kees Custers, Research Engineer Damen Shipyards Gorinchem; Vincent Wegener, Managing Director RAMLAB; Wei Ya, Postdoctoral Researcher RAMLAB; Constantinos Goulas, Postdoctoral Researcher RAMLAB; Max van der Zalm, Design Engineer Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding; Don Hoogendoorn, Principal Research Engineer Damen Shipyards Gorinchem; Kelvin Hamilton, Technical Consultant Autodesk; and Laurens van Ballegooy, Sales Manager Promarin (Photo: RAMLAB/Damen)

WAAMpeller: World First Class-Approved 3D Printed Ship’s Propeller

A consortium of organizations are working toward a landmark achievement in the maritime sectors: creating the world's first class-approved 3D-printed ship's propeller. As many sectors of the shipbuilding industry suffer due to overcapacity, it is this type of innovative leap that will -- if successful -- separate the next generation of leaders in the sector. In the effort a cooperative consortium of Damen Shipyards Group, RAMLAB, Promarin, Autodesk and Bureau Veritas aim to develop the world’s first class approved 3D printed ship’s propeller, dubbed WAAMpeller.

Image: Tru-Marine

3D Printing Enables Quick Turbocharger Repair

The first 3D-printed nozzle ring for marine turbochargers has been developed using exotic super metal alloy, enables the reconstruction of worn out components for shorter repair times. According to the technology’s developer, Tru-Marine, the premature erosion of nozzle rings has been a commonly reported problem, and in such situations, spare part replacements are often unavailable and come with long lead times at high costs. The company has therefore developed proprietary processes in 3D printing…