Thursday, June 20, 2019

Alaska News

The V/V LISERON in Southeast Alaska. Courtesy of The Boat Company

New Power for Alaskan Classic

Thousands of people travel Alaska on mega-cruise ships each year, but only a handful get to cruise Alaskan waters on the immaculate M/V LISERON. Built in Seattle in 1952 by the US Navy as a minesweeper she was sold to France, but returned to Seattle in 1990 after being lovingly converted to yacht-class in Florida.The late Michael Allan McIntosh, philanthropist and environmentalist, founded The Boat Company in 1979, initially as a program of The McIntosh Foundation. The LISERON joined The Boat Company’s first vessel…

Photocredit: Rolls-Royce Marine

US Pelagic Trawler Picks TMC compressors

Shipbuilder Thoma-Sea Marine Constructors has awarded TMC Compressors of the Seas (TMC) a contract to deliver a complete marine compressed air system for the 100 m long Rolls-Royce designed pelagic trawler the yard is building for Seattle based Arctic Storm Management Group.According to a press release from the Louisiana-based Thoma-Sea, which designs, constructs, and delivers vessels, tugs, and ships for the commercial marine sector, TMC’s scope of work is to develop and supply…

The Nordic Lady all back together and ready for sea trials. (Photo: 
 Southeast Diesel)

Nordic Lady: Keeping a Good Boat Up to Date

When Trygve Westergard bought the 98- by 28-foot Judi B in the spring of 2016 he was entering a new chapter in a varied marine career. Growing up on a remote island off Ketchikan, Alaska as the third generation of Norwegian-Danish family, he had fishing in his blood and his environment. A stint at the California Maritime Academy earned him an unlimited masters license and a BS in marine transportation.After a decade of running everything from ferries to off-shore boats and filling the gaps with fishing, Westergard decided it was time to come home.

The MT Seriana on the Bosporus: severe corrosion problems were solved with Chevron’s Special HT Ultra 140 BN cylinder oil. (Photo: Chevron)

Fuels, Lubricants & Green Marine

International Maritime Organization (IMO) fuel rules entering force in 2020 mandate a drastic sulfur reduction. By 2050 the mandate is to cut greenhouse gas emissions of shipping by at least 50 percent.Marine fuels, lubricants and additives manufacturers play their part in establishing maritime’s green credentials by introducing new environmentally acceptable technologies and products.The shipping industry is more than ever portrayed in a bad light due to increasing awareness of its contribution to global climate change, according to Dirk Kronmeijer, CEO of GoodFuels Marine.

(Photo: Skangas)

LNG is the Bridge to ‘Zero Emissions’ Shipping

The advent of industry wide tightening of allowable sulfur emissions is getting nearer. Suddenly, with the deadline now little more than one year away, the countdown clock will very soon be ticking much louder. Simply stated, the cap on allowable sulfur content in marine fuels, presently at 3.5 percent in many geographical regions, will be reduced to 0.5 percent in January 2020. The 0.1 percent sulfur cap, already in effect since 2015 in coastal Emissions Control Areas (ECAs) in Europe and North America…

Golden Alaska (Photo: Power Fuel Savers)

Fishing Vessel Sees Large Fuel Savings

The 305-foot factory trawler f/v Golden Alaska is powered by twin MAK six-cylinder engines and has a large boiler used to support large fishmeal-fish oil processor and hoteling galley needs of the 130-person crew and factory personnel. The vessel is in its fourth year and eighth pollock season using the Fitch Fuel Catalyst on output of dual centrifuges for a 5,300-gallon day tank. They get approximately 18 months service from each core and now are on their third one. “I can attest to a fuel savings as well as a much cleaner burn…

(Photo: YANMAR)

YANMAR Cruises Into Alaska with Power to Spare

YANMAR only recently arrived in the Pacific Northwest with its mechanical 6AYAM-ET diesel engine. It looks like they are here to stay. In November of last year, YANMAR America and its guests officially opened the YANMAR EVO//CENTER in Acworth, Ga. Situated on 50-plus acres of land in Cherokee County, the new 50,000 square foot facility features six state-of-the-art product training labs with classroom and hands-on space, three classrooms, multiple meeting rooms, office space, a 250-seat auditorium, and myriad other amenities and features.

Credit: NCDOT

North Carolina Ferries Change Course for the Future

Shoaling shifts NCDOT’s propulsion needs, prompting a sea change. Thrustmaster waterjets step in to carry the day. In Swansboro, N.C., boatbuilder U.S. Workboats (formerly Armstrong Marine) is assembling the linchpin of the North Carolina Department of Transport’s (NCDOT) business plan for its future Outer Banks ferry services. Separately, in both Hatteras and Ocracoke, crews are preparing to break ground on new parking additions and visitor facilities. The Ocracoke Express passenger…

(Photo: TOTE)

TOTE Completes Phase 1 of LNG Conversions

TOTE Maritime Alaska said it has completed the first of four conversion periods for the Orca class vessels, a process which will enable the ships to use liquefied natural gas (LNG) as fuel. TOTE Maritime’s North Star arrived in Anchorage yesterday, completing her first voyage after being outfitted with two LNG tanks immediately behind the ship’s bridge. In addition to the LNG tanks and accompanying infrastructure, the ship received critical engine updates necessary to utilize LNG as a fuel and underwent a standard regulatory dry-dock.

(Credit: Conrad Shipyard)

Green Shipping: Cargo Carriers Clutch at Compliance

LNG looms as the bridge to a ‘zero emissions’ future for shipping. The advent of industry wide tightening of allowable sulfur emissions is getting nearer. Suddenly, with the deadline now just one year away, the countdown clock will very soon be ticking much louder. Simply stated, the cap on allowable sulfur content in marine fuels, presently at 3.5 percent in many geographical regions, will be reduced to 0.5 percent in January 2020. The 0.1 percent sulfur cap, already in effect since 2015 in coastal Emissions Control Areas (ECAs) in Europe and North America, will remain.

Pictured at MAN Diesel & Turbo's Headquarter in Augsburg (from left): Stefan Eefting - Senior Vice President and Head of MAN PrimeServ Augsburg; Peter Keller - Executive Vice President of TOTE; Per Rud - Senior Vice President and Head of After Sales - Marine & Power Plants.

TOTE Invests (again) in LNG Conversions

TOTE Inc., courtesy of being the first in the world to order containerships powered by LNG, have been leaders in the push to design and build tonnage ahead of the emissions regulation curve. The company again makes headline with the announcement that TOTE Maritime Alaska has contracted MAN PrimeServ – MAN Diesel & Turbo’s after-sales division – to convert a pair of RoRo ships, North Star and Midnight Sun to dual-fuel operation on liquefied natural gas (LNG). Today the vessels are powered by four × MAN 58/64 engines and will be retrofitted to MAN 58/64 retrofit units.

Glosten to Design Electric Ferry for Skagit County

Washington’s Skagit County has selected Seattle based naval architecture and marine engineering consultancy Glosten to design a new all-electric vehicle/passenger ferry. The new ferry will replace M/V Guemes, which has provided service between Anacortes and Guemes Island, Wash. since 1979, and is now nearing the end of its economic useful life. With a capacity of 99 passengers and 21 vehicles, the vessel forms a primary mode of transit for residents of and visitors to Guemes Island.

(Credit: Ingram Marine Group)

Sizing Up the Market, Scaling Solutions to Size

In October of 2014, news of Oceaneering’s purchase of GE Transportation’s newest marine engine offering was making waves. These engines – ones which meet EPA Tier 4i and IMO Tier III Emissions standards – without the need for a Selective Catalytic Reduction system (SCR) exhaust gas after-treatment, had workboat operators everywhere looking at new possibilities. Before that, Harvey Gulf International Marine also entered into a contract to construct a new Multipurpose Field Support Vessel (MPFSV) at Eastern Shipbuilding, this one also powered by GE’s Tier 4 compliant, EGR main engines.

(Photo: Nautican)

Nautican to Ship First IPU from Prince Edward Island

The Nautican Research and Development manufacturing facility in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, said it is now ready to ship the facility's first Integrated Propulsion Unit (IPU) to a client in Alaska. “Nautican is another excellent example of an emerging advanced marine technology company finding success right here on Prince Edward Island,” said PEI Minister of Economic Development and Tourism, Heath MacDonald, who was on site with Nautican representatives to review the Ocean Series Class 200 IPU system prior to shipment.

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

The Earl W. Redd on christening day

Navigating the ABCs of SCR

On the way to Tier IV compliance, it turns out that experience counts. In late February, the nation’s first Tier IV, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) tugboat was christened. That’s probably not earthshaking news all by itself – after all, SCR isn’t all that new – but the event likely ushers in a new era of powerful domestic workboats that also come with a greener environmental footprint. How all of that comes together is a bigger story, and one which will play out again and again in the coming year or two.

Photo Supplied by Matson

Matson Completes Upgrade of Alaska Fleet

Matson has welcomed Matson Anchorage back to Alaska following three months of work to upgrade the vessel, including the installation of new equipment that virtually eliminates particulate matter and sulfur from engine exhaust, making it one of the cleanest ships operating in Alaska. Matson Anchorage was the last of Matson's three D7 Class containerships serving Alaska to receive the new equipment. Sister ships Matson Kodiak and Matson Tacoma underwent the same upgrade work and were returned to service last year.

Photo: Nautican

New Nautican Facility Readies First Shipment

The new Nautican Research and Development manufacturing and integration facility in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, opened in December 2016 with the support of Babcock Canada and the provincial government. The first shipment, a set of rudders, is nearing completion and will soon be delivered to Pacific Fisherman in Seattle. The new facility produces Nautican’s High-Efficiency marine propulsion products. Over the coming years Nautican will progressively transition the manufacturing of its Integrated Propulsion Units (IPUs) to the new facility as well.