Sunday, January 20, 2019

Baltic Sea News

Photo: Sharrow Engineering

New High Efficiency Propeller Introduced

Philadelphia design firm Sharrow Engineering, LLC  announced that the company’s propeller design has been awarded patents in the U.S., Japan, Canada, and European Union with further domestic and international patents pending. Additionally, the final phase of testing on its core propeller product has been completed.Over the past six years, Sharrow Engineering has analyzed extensive testing data collected at the University of Michigan’s Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory and implemented a rigorous in-water test program using manned vessels in lakes, rivers, and bays.

Photo: Thordon

Thordon Bearings Strengthens European Presence

Thordon Bearings, the provider of bearing solutions for marine, has signed sales and distribution agreements with St. Petersburg-based Industrial & Marine Projects (IMPRO) and Tallinn’s Marine Ecology Equipment (MEE), in a development that anticipates the introduction of more stringent pollution rules for European waterways.The appointment of new distributors for Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Russia and Azerbaijan coincides with concern that more should be done to reduce the impact…

(Photo: Danfoss)

New Hybrid Electric Patrol Boat for Estonia

A new multipurpose 45-meter patrol ship will be used by the Estonian Police and Border Guard Service for a wide range of operations, including firefighting, anti-smuggling and search and rescue missions, but its main use will be in combating pollution threats.The new vessel, Raju, is the largest patrol vessel ever built by Estonia’s Baltic Workboats, and is the first in the firm’s emerging range of battery hybrid patrol ships.From 2021 the Baltic Sea will become an Emission Control Area (ECA)…

El Coquí, one of the world’s first ConRos powered by LNG (Photo: Crowley)

New Fuel Rules Push Shipowners to Go Green with LNG

Tough new rules on marine fuel are forcing shipowners to explore liquefied natural gas as a cleaner alternative and ports such as Gibraltar are preparing to offer upgraded refueling facilities in the shipping industry's biggest shake-up in decades.From 2020, International Maritime Organization rules will ban ships from using fuels with a sulphur content above 0.5 percent, compared with 3.5 percent now, unless they are equipped to clean up sulphur emissions. This will be enforced…

Photo courtesy of DGzRS

German Search and Rescue Fleet Upgrades

SAR, the universal designation for Search And Rescue, can appear as a designation on air, land or marine vehicles in many different countries. Always the vehicle and the people who provide the service are treated with respect. For those who are saved from life threatening situations, SAR takes on an even greater value.Among small recreational and fishing boats along Germany’s coastlines, the SAR people have a proud history. This is now being recognized with some excellent and practical new aluminum vessels.

Photo: DuPont.

Global Scrubber System Market to Reach USD 1.86 bln by 2023

The global scrubber system market is estimated at USD 1.02 billion in 2018 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 12.82% to reach USD 1.86 billion by 2023. The global market is likely to grow significantly due to growing stringent environmental regulations to reduce atmospheric emissions, said a market research from Reportlinker. Although restraints like stringent legislations against disposal of contaminated effluents from scrubber systems are being observed, International Maritime…

© Igor Terekhov / Adobe Stock

‘Black Box’ Promises to Crack Down on Ship Emissions

The Danish Maritime Association (DMA) has been examining new ways to use digital solutions for collecting and sharing data on ships’ sulfur emissions. Digitalization, DMA says, could be the key to better emissions enforcement.Danish company Litehauz, working under the the DMA led EfficienSea2 project, has recently developed a solution similar to the black box found on airplanes, but for transmitting sulfur emissions data to vessel owners and relevant authorities on land.The aim of this new technology is to make emissions monitoring more efficient.

(Photo: Skangas)

LNG is the Bridge to ‘Zero Emissions’ Shipping

The advent of industry wide tightening of allowable sulfur emissions is getting nearer. Suddenly, with the deadline now little more than one year away, the countdown clock will very soon be ticking much louder. Simply stated, the cap on allowable sulfur content in marine fuels, presently at 3.5 percent in many geographical regions, will be reduced to 0.5 percent in January 2020. The 0.1 percent sulfur cap, already in effect since 2015 in coastal Emissions Control Areas (ECAs) in Europe and North America…

(Image: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä: Maintenance Pact for Viking Grace

Wärtsilä and Viking Line signed an Optimized Maintenance agreement for the Wärtsilä LNGPac system onboard passenger ferry Viking Grace, significant in that it is the first Optimized Maintenance agreement ever made for Wärtsilä LNGPac, a complete gas handling system for ships fueled by liquefied natural gas (LNG). Viking Grace was the first passenger ferry to useLNG as a fuel source. The agreement also includes Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) and online support for the Wärtsilä LNGPac system.

A Norsepower rotor sail was installed on board the passenger vessel Viking Grace (Photo: Norsepower)

Rotor Sail Installed Aboard Viking Grace

Cruise ferry M/S Viking Grace has become the world’s first passenger ship equipped with a rotor sail to harness wind power for propulsion. The rotor sail, developed by Finnish engineering company Norsepower Oy Ltd., is a modernized version of the Flettner rotor: a vertical spinning cylinder that uses the Magnus effect to harness wind power to propel a ship. When wind meets the spinning rotor sail, the air flow accelerates on one side of the rotor and decelerates on the opposite side.

Dr. Arnt Vespermann, Chief Executive Officer, Hamburg Süd. Photo credit Hamburg Süd Group

Hamburg Süd, Electrolux partner for SO2 Reductions

Hamburg Süd and its Swedish customer Electrolux are teaming up to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions in ports. During its layovers in Manzanillo, Mexico; Callao, Peru; and Iquique and Puerto Angamos, Chile. Between March 11 and 24, the 7,114 TEU containershp Santa Catarina voluntarily used cleaner marine gas oil (MGO) instead of standard heavy fuel oil (HFO) to operate its auxiliary engines and boilers. Hamburg Süd and Electrolux already carried out a fuel upgrade in the past, thereby making a contribution to environmental and health protection.

Photo: Nauticor

Nauticor Extends its LNG Supply Network

Nauticor has extended its liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply network for ships within the North Sea region and has now begun delivering to maritime customers in the Port of Rotterdam. The Dutch port is the latest location added to the firm’s LNG distribution network, adding to a growing portfolio of one of the leading suppliers of LNG as fuel for ships. The premier bunker operation by Nauticor in the Port of Rotterdam saw the containership Wes Amelie, owned by Wessels Reederei based in Haren/Ems, receive the chilled fuel.

(Credit: Conrad Shipyard)

Green Shipping: Cargo Carriers Clutch at Compliance

LNG looms as the bridge to a ‘zero emissions’ future for shipping. The advent of industry wide tightening of allowable sulfur emissions is getting nearer. Suddenly, with the deadline now just one year away, the countdown clock will very soon be ticking much louder. Simply stated, the cap on allowable sulfur content in marine fuels, presently at 3.5 percent in many geographical regions, will be reduced to 0.5 percent in January 2020. The 0.1 percent sulfur cap, already in effect since 2015 in coastal Emissions Control Areas (ECAs) in Europe and North America, will remain.

Viking Line ferry. Photo: Wärtsilä

Wärtsilä to Power Viking Line Ferry

Wärtsilä will supply the engines, the navigation system and a broad scope of other products and systems for a new luxury and environmentally friendly ferry being built for the Finland based operator, Viking Line. The ship is being built at the Xiamen Shipbuilding Industry yard in China and there is an option for a second vessel. The order with Wärtsilä was booked in October 2017. Six Wärtsilä 31DF dual-fuel engines running primarily on liquefied natural gas (LNG) will provide the propulsion and power for the vessel.

Wes Amelie is now driven by a 7,800 kW MAN 8L51/60DF main engine. (Photo: Wessels Reederei)

Inside the World's First LNG Containership Conversion

The world’s first container feeder vessel refit to use natural gas was commissioned in late August in Bremerhaven, ushering in a new era in the use of alternative fuels across the global maritime sector. The container vessel Wes Amelie, owned by Wessels Reederei, Haren/Ems, was converted for the use of methane as a standard fuel at the German Dry Docks Shipyard in Bremerhaven, making it the world’s first of its kind vessel which consumes environmentally friendly methane. This conversion is more than simply another environmentally advanced ship…

In total, four trucks of LNG were brought to the German port and transferred to Wes Amelie (Photo: Nauticor)

First Containership Retrofitted to Run on LNG

The world’s first containership retrofitted with a liquefied natural gas (LNG) engine was launched on August 23, 2017. Since May 2017, the 1,000 TEU containership Wes Amelie, owned by Wessels Reederei based in Harem/Ems, has undergone an engine conversion at the German Dry Docks in Bremerhaven, and from this point forward will run on LNG fuel. Experts from the Hamburg based company Nauticor were selected to conduct the vessel’s initial LNG bunkering at the Kühlhauskai in the Port of Bremerhaven. In total, four trucks of LNG were brought to the German port and transferred to the vessel.

New tankers for Erik Thun AB will feature Wärtsilä propulsion and fuel supply solutions (Image: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä Dual-fuel Engines for Tanker Newbuilds

Wärtsilä said it has been contracted to supply the engines, propellers and fuel supply systems for four new tanker vessels. The ships will run on both liquefied natural gas (LNG) and diesel, and are being built at the Scheepswerf Ferus Smit yard in the Netherlands for Sweden based Erik Thun AB. The order with Wärtsilä was booked in the first quarter of 2017. In 2014, the Scheepswerf Ferus Smit yard built two cement carriers on behalf of Erik Thun AB. These are now operated by JT Cement; a joint venture company with Norway based KG Jebsen Cement.

Photo: Langh Tech

Langh Tech Scrubber Honored

The scrubber from Langh Tech received the Baltic Sea Clean Maritime Award at the Baltic Sea Forum in Berlin. The third-place award was handed to Langh Group’s Chairman of the Board, Maritime Counsellor Hans Langh by Professor Kurt Bodewig, European Coordinator Baltic-Adriatic. The Forum was organized in connection with the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region (EUSBSR) Annual Forum. The Baltic Sea Clean Maritime Award is awarded to innovative and environmentally friendly solutions and ideas, which promote the well-being of the Baltic Sea.