Monday, September 16, 2019

Block Island News

(Photo: Volvo Penta)

Offshore Wind Drives Demand for US Support Vessels

The offshore energy boom: more than wind. Domestic offshore wind also promises to generate demand for new, efficiently propelled support vessels. The U.S. offshore wind farm industry, now in its infancy, is on the verge of a massive growth surge, and the boom will be felt throughout the American maritime industry. The U.S. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy reported last year that there is a “robust pipeline of projects to ensure growth in the country’s nascent offshore wind market…

Photo: Twin Disc

D-Day Ship Turned Ferry Repowered

As part of the June 6, 1944 Normandy landings, the USS LST-510 (landing ship for tanks) delivered 200 GIs, and 70 tanks and jeeps to Omaha Beach. She then anchored offshore to serve as an impromptu hospital ship for the over 150,000 Allied wounded. For three months following the invasion, she ferried injured soldiers back to England and supplies back to the front, evading German U-boats and dive bombers. She was awarded a Battle Star for her meritorious participation. Thought to be the last D-Day ship still in active service…

Photo: Volvo Penta

Volvo Penta Stakes Position in Wind Farm Support Vessels

Volvo Penta has emerged as a leading supplier of propulsion systems for support boats in the booming offshore wind farm industry in Europe, and is poised to capture a significant position as new wind farms come into service in North America. “Wind farm support vessels operate under some of the world’s most difficult conditions,” said Jens Bering, vice president of marine sales for Volvo Penta of the Americas. “They must be able to work 24/7 in high winds and heavy seas delivering crew and materials quickly and safely to the offshore towers without wasting time and fuel.

The Sea Blade 35 is put through its paces on Narragansett Bay, May 29, 2015 (NavatekNEB photo).

Navatek, NEB Launch Sea Blade 35

Navatek, the naval research and design company based in Hawaii and Rhode Island, and NEB, a leading builder of high-tech composite and aluminum boats based in Portsmouth, R.I., announce the launching of the Sea Blade 35, a 35-foot rigid hull inflatable boat (RIB) with a top speed of 60 knots. The Sea Blade line of powerboats features a patented hull form designed by Navatek founder and Chairman Steven Loui, a native of Hawaii. The stabilized monohull design has a slender center hull with two stabilizing amas, which form entrapment tunnels between the main hull and amas.

Photo: Thrustmaster

Unique DP System Thrusts US Offshore Wind Sector

Offshore wind construction in the U.S. Thrustmaster of Texas, a marine propulsion design and manufacturing company in the U.S., is looking to give an edge to U.S. based marine jack-up operators wanting to enter the U.S. offshore wind farm construction and maintenance sector by cutting the cost of entry in half with a unique propulsion system that allows conversion of existing vessels to dynamically positioned work vessels. The United States’ offshore wind market is exploding with opportunity, and current marine construction contracts are being awarded to operators outside the U.S.

NOAA Ship 'Thomas Jefferson': Photo credit NOAA

NOAA Ship 'Thomas Jefferson' Returns

The NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson wraps up an exceptionally eventful field season. After 193 days away from home, the hydrographic survey vessel completed 14, 768.9 linear nautical miles of survey that covered 352 square nautical miles of area in Long Island Sound and Block Island Sound. Due to this work, 38 dangers to navigation (DTONs) were issued, protecting maritime traffic in the area. Additionally, the Thomas Jefferson was in prime position to respond to the devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in October and November. The U.S.