Tuesday, June 19, 2018

California News

AMP Connect: Photo courtesy of Cavotec

Plug In to AMP or Stay Away from California Ports

Come Jan. 1, 2014, the maritime industry in California faces a looming reality: ships must link up to port alternative maritime power (AMP). “Compliance is not optional,” said T.L. Garrett, vice president of Pacific Merchant Shipping Association. Garrett’s group represents the majority of international shipping lines and terminal operators doing business on the West Coast; most of them will be impacted by state rules to go into effect next year mandating the use of shore power for container, reefer and cruise ships.

Ship Manager Fined for Emissions Regulations Breach

A ship management company has been fined $283,500 in connection with a breach of clean air regulations in the United States, the International Transport Intermediaries Club (ITIC) has confirmed. ITIC reports that an inspector of the California Air Resources Board, the clean air agency of the state of California, boarded a ship in July 2011 at a terminal in Los Angeles. The chief engineer was asked if he was aware of the revised 2009 California clean air regulations which required vessels to switch main engine…

SAMCon solution with a step down transformer

L-3 SAM Helps Hamburg Süd Meet California Regulations

L-3 SAM Electronics announced today that after one year of preparation time, seven container ships currently chartered by Hamburg Süd and regularly calling at the U.S. West Coast ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles, Port Hueneme and Oakland, Calif., were equipped with its latest SAMCon high-voltage onshore power connection facilities, enabling the vessels to meet California’s strict clean air regulations. The regulations establish measures for providing shore-based, emission-free electrical power to vessels, allowing their main and auxiliary engines to be disengaged while in port.

ARB Approves "OGV Clean Fuel Regulations"

At a public hearing on June 23, 2011, the Air Resources Board (ARB) approved amendments to the regulations “Fuel Sulfur and Other Operational Requirements for Ocean-Going Vessels within California Waters and 24 Nautical Miles of the California Baseline” (title 13, California Code of Regulations [CCR], section 2299.2, and title 17 California Code of Regulations, section 93118.2). Section 2299.2 is a regulation for ocean-going vessels (OGV) and section 93118.2 is a substantively identical airborne toxic control measure (ATCM).

HII Delivers Submarine Ahead of Schedule

Huntington Ingalls Industries has announced that its Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division delivered the Virginia-class submarine California (SSN781) to the U.S. Navy yesterday. The delivery came more than eight and a half months early to the contract date and nearly five months faster than NNS' previous delivery of New Mexico. California, the world's most modern and sophisticated nuclear-powered attack submarine, recently returned to NNS following the successful completion of its third and final round of sea trials."This is the day that shipbuilders work toward…

Advisory to Owners or Operators of Ocean-Going Vessels Visiting California Ports

The purpose of this advisory is to notify owners and operators of ocean-going vessels (OGVs) of amendments to the OGV Fuel Regulation. Amendments to the regulation were endorsed by the California Air Resources Board on June 23, 2011. These amendments were made available for a 45-day public comment period beginning on May 9, 2011. In addition, changes to the originally proposed modifications (“15-day changes”) were presented at the Board Hearing and made available for a 15-day public comment period from July 25, 2011 to August 9, 2011.

NOAA: Air Pollution Plummets when Ships Shift Fuels

New clean fuel regulations in California and voluntary slowdowns by shipping companies substantially reduce air pollution caused by near-shore ships, according to a new NOAA-led study published online today in Environmental Science & Technology. The study examined a container ship operating under a 2009 California regulation requiring that ships switch to low-sulfur fuels as they approach the California coast, and also adhering to a voluntary state slowdown policy, intended to reduce pollution.

Calif. Fines Shippers $440K for Violating Fuel Regulation

The California Air Resources Board has fined three international shipping companies a combined $440,250 for failure to switch from dirty bunker fuel to cleaner, low-sulfur marine distillate fuel upon entering Regulated California Waters, as required by state law. “Ships en route to California ports emit thousands of tons of diesel exhaust each year,” said ARB Enforcement Chief Jim Ryden. An ARB investigation showed that on 17 visits to California ports between November 6, 2009 and July 18…

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

CARB Taps CMA to Assess Ship Fuel Regs

The California Maritime Academy (CMA) was contracted to evaluate issues associated with the implementation of the California Air Resources Board (ARB) ship fuel regulation. While most vessel operators are successfully complying with the regulation without incident, some operators have reported operational difficulties that may be related to fuel switching from heavy fuel oil to distillate fuel. The Ocean-Going Vessel Clean Fuel Regulation provides significant air quality benefits by requiring vessels to use cleaner, low sulfur distillate fuel when visiting California ports.

California Air Resources Board Marine Notice 2011-2

Advisory to Owners or Operators of Ocean-Going Vessels Visiting California Ports. Nature of Marine Notice: Changes to the Regulation on Fuel Sulfur and Other Operational Requirements for Ocean-Going Vessels within California Waters and 24 Nautical Miles of the California. Baseline: The purpose of this advisory is to notify owners and operators of ocean-going vessels (OGVs) of changes to the OGV Fuel Regulation. California’s ARB will begin enforcement of the changes to the rule on December 1, 2011.

Capt. Jeff Cowan

Preventing Loss of Propulsion After Fuel Switch to Low Sulfur Distillate Fuel

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) ANNEX VI Regulation 14 requires ships with Marine Compression-Ignition Engines at or Above 30 Liters per Cylinder use fuel with sulfur content less than 0.1%, after 01 January 2015 within the Baltic Sea area – as defined in Annex I of MARPOL, North Sea area – as defined in Annex V of MARPOL; within 200 miles of the North American area and when operating in the United States Caribbean Sea area – as defined in Appendix VII of Annex VI of MARPOL.

A Closer Look at the Effects of ECAs

It’s a fact: Emission Control Areas (ECA) clean up the air that we breathe. It’s also a good bet that someday, ECAs might be the primary cause of dirtier water. That’s because the physical act of switching from fuel oil to cleaner burning distillates on oceangoing craft is anything but a routine event for some vessels. But, don’t take our word for it – the State of California does a pretty good job of recordkeeping, and the numbers don’t lie. It’s probably a good thing, then, that the U.S.

Port of L.A. Ready for Calif. Shore-side Power Requirements

With more berths for ships to plug into shore-side electric power, or Alternative Maritime Power (AMP), than any other port in the world, the Port of Los Angeles said it is fully ready for its terminal operators and ocean carriers to meet California’s new clean air requirements. “The Port developed and invested heavily in AMP ahead of the regulations to bring the tremendous environmental benefits of shore-side power to our region,” said Gary Lee Moore, Interim Executive Director of the Port of Los Angeles.

CA Ocean-Going Vessel Fuel Regulation Marine Notice (2012-1)

The California Air Resources Board staff has issued an advisory (Marine Notice 2012-1) regarding upcoming changes in the vessel fuel sulfur requirements beginning August 1, 2012. The advisory also reminds operators that they must comply with both the California Ocean-Going Vessel Fuel Regulation and the North American Emission Control Area requirements. The California Ocean-Going Vessel Fuel Regulation provides significant air quality benefits by requiring vessels to use cleaner, low sulfur distillate fuel when visiting California ports.

Photo: Vovlo Penta

CARB Powers Clean Air in California

California Commercial Marine Operators Take Advantage of Grant Money to Repower with Eco-Friendly Engines. Capt. Joe Nazar recently repowered his whale watching excursion vessel in San Francisco with twin Volvo Penta Tier 3 diesels, and he couldn’t be happier with the results. Since the new engines were installed, he is seeing dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency, lower emissions, reduced noise levels and better performance. He has another good reason to be happy. A large percentage of the cost of repowering the boat came from a State of California grant. Nazar’s 64-ft.

Photo: Port of Los Angeles

California OGV Fuel Regulations Under Review

The California Air Resources Board (ARB) issued an advisory to owners or operators of oceangoing vessels visiting California ports offering guidance for complying with the state’s fuel regulations during the Air Resources Board Sunset review process. The California Oceangoing Vessel (OGV) Fuel Regulation includes a sunset provision which states that the requirements of the California OGV Fuel Regulation will cease to apply if the United States adopts and enforces requirements…

Cash to Reduce California Container Port Pollution

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grants $1.34-million to a Port of Long Beach project to deploy cleaner cargo-handling equipment. The funds will help two terminals, Piers A and J, to retrofit 11 rubber-tired gantry cranes with diesel particulate filters or exhaust treatment technologies. The grant also will allow the future Middle Harbor terminal to fund five yard tractors to run on electricity instead of diesel. Piers A and J are operated by SSA Terminals. Middle Harbor will be operated by Long Beach Container Terminal (LBCT), currently at Pier F.