Monday, October 14, 2019

Chemical Reaction News

ABS has granted Approval in Principle to Wärtsilä for a hybrid-powered, tug design. The new design will form the foundation for Wärtsilä’s new portfolio of tug designs, known as the Wärtsilä HYTug Series. (Image: Wärtsilä)

Tech File: Propelling Hybrid Electric Solutions

Growing interest in hybrid-electric power systems is expanding the search for new propulsion and energy-storage systems in the workboat sector, where compliance with emerging environmental regulations and a relentless pursuit of operational efficiency are driving change. To meet demands for cleaner more efficient power, owners are examining the potential for less conventional methods of energy generation and storage – such as fuel cells, lithium-ion batteries, super-capacitors, flywheels, wind and solar – to propel their vessels.

Marine Fuels: Unmasking Gas

A primer on the way forward for alternative fuels for marine propulsion. By now, many of us have been passed by a garbage truck, taken a ride on an airport bus or hailed a taxi cab that is clearly labeled by their respective marketing departments that these vehicles are powered by clean burning natural gas. Even now in our own maritime industry, some trendy operators are looking to make the case for liquefied natural gas (LNG) propulsion systems, others are opting for hybrid-electric solutions, and some are even aiming for full electric configurations.

Photo: Power Fuel Savers

Fuel Catalyst Makes Engines More Efficient

Engines are designed to run on refinery grade fuel. At the time fuel is refined, it is at its purest state; however, it deteriorates rapidly as it oxidizes and is attacked by a host of organisms (bacteria, yeast, molds), that change the molecular structure of the fuel. The Fitch Fuel Catalyst (FFC) reverses this natural aging process by inducing a chemical reaction using a patented metal alloy catalyst (not a liquid additive) that reforms diesel fuel, creating a more combustible, cleaner burning product as evidenced by the end-user comments presented in this document.

Rendering of the Petrofac JDS 6000 deepwater derrick-lay vessel (courtesy Petrofac)

NOx-reduction System Ordered for Deepwater Vessel

MAN Diesel & Turbo won the contract to provide a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system for each of six MAN 16V32/44CR engines that will power the Petrofac JDS 6000 deepwater derrick-lay vessel ordered in January 2014 by international oil and gas services provider Petrofac. The SCR systems and engines will be constructed at MAN Diesel & Turbo’s Augsburg, Germany facility, while the vessel will be constructed by the ZPMC yard in China using a proprietary Petrofac design. MAN Diesel & Turbo and Petrofac have also entered a 12-year service contract for the management…

Certificate award: Photo courtesy of MAN

MAN Retrofits SCR System to DFDS Ship

MAN Diesel & Turbo says it has been awarded a Tier III-compatibility certificate by the DNV-GL classification society for MAN 8L21/31 four-stroke engine aboard a DFDS Seaways ship with a retrofitted SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system. While the engine alone meets IMO Tier II emission criteria, the SCR system for NOx reduction raises the whole system to the standard demanded by IMO Tier III rules. The ‘Petunia Seaways’ is a cargo ship that sails a regular North Sea route between Gothenburg, and Immingham, respectively for DFDS Seaways.

MAN-Powered Cargo Vessel Meets Tier III

Classification society awards SCR system emissions certificate. MAN Diesel & Turbo has been awarded a Tier III - compatibility certificate by the DNV- GL classification society for MAN 8L21/31 four- stroke engine aboard a DFDS Seaways ship with a retrofitted SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) system. While the engine alone meets IMO Tier II emission criteria, the SCR system for NOx reduction raises the whole system to the standard demanded by IMO Tier III rules. The vessel in question…

AHTS Maersk Chamion

DMAIB Publishes 'Maersk Champion' Fire Report

The Danish Maritime Accident Investigation Board (DMAIB) reports on the fire that occured on board in early 2012. On 9 January 2012, a fire broke out in the ship’s hospital of the AHTS vessel Maersk Champion that was engaged in tanker lifting/heading control off the Brazilian coast. The cause of the fire was self ignition by a chemical reaction between chlorine-containing granules and other chemical substances in a plastic box with medicine and chemical residues located in the ship's hospital.

First SCR NOx Removal System Installed on Coal Bulker

Aiming to Meet the IMO's Tier III NOx Emission Controls Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha, Oshima Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Akasaka Diesels Limited, and Sakai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd are to begin shipboard tests of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) nitrogen oxide (NOx) removal equipment installed on NYK Line's new bulk coal carrier Initial Salute, which was built by Oshima Shipbuilding. Shipboard trials of SCR NOx removal equipment were conducted during the voyage of Initial Salute.