Monday, August 3, 2020

Container Carrier News

Left to right:  Thomas Hansen, Director, Head of Promotion & Customer Support, for MAN, Dr. Xioazhi (Christina) Wang, ABS Vice President, Global Marine, and Mr. Zhiyong Zhou, SDARI Vice President, at signing of joint development project for a low-emission, ammonia-fueled containment vessel. Photo: ABS

Partnership Envisions Ammonia-Fueled Feeder Ship

ABS joined forces with MAN Energy Solutions (MAN) and the Shanghai Merchant Ship Design & Research Institute (SDARI) to develop an ammonia-fueled feeder vessel.The joint development project aims to produce designs for an ammonia-fueled Chittagongmax container carrier of 2700 TEU capacity.“Ammonia is an energy source with significant potential to help the industry meet IMO 2030 and 2050 emission targets but will require stringent new safety standards to be developed in order to support its adoption,” said Dr.

(Photo: Eric Haun)

Maersk to Spend $2 Bln to Meet 2020 Sulphur Cap

Maersk Line said it will introduce a new Bunker Adjustment Factor (BAF) surcharge designed to recover costs of compliance with the global 0.5 percent sulphur cap set to enter into force on January 1, 2020. The Danish container carrier said it expects its extra fuel costs could exceed $2 billion.The BAF surcharge will be introduced on January 1, 2019, replacing Maersk Line's current Standard Bunker Adjustment Factor (SBF) surcharge. The new surcharge considers the average fuel…

Photo: Maersk

Big Data Helps Shippers Cut Fuel Bills, Emissions

By focusing on operational improvements, shipping companies are reducing fuel consumption, saving money and cutting greenhouse emissions, while continuing to increase the amount of freight transported. Maersk Line, the world's largest container carrier, cut fuel consumption by more than 13 percent between 2012 and 2014, while increasing the number of boxes carried by 11 percent, according to company records. Maersk's fuel savings amount to 1.35 million tonnes of fuel per year - and 1.5 million tonnes per year if the increase in freight volumes is taken into account.

Image: CMA CGM

CMA CGM Reducing Fleet CO2 Emissions

The CMA CGM Group confirms its objective to reduce CO2 emissions by 50% by the end of 2015 (compared to 2005). On the occasion of the June 5 World Environment Day, the CMA CGM Group, the world’s third largest container shipping company and number one in France, confirmed its objective set at 50% reduction CO2/teu-km between 2005 and 2015. In 2013, the global operated fleet CO2 performance has been improved by 4%, and even 8% for the owned fleet, thus a 40% reduction achieved since 2005.

Maersk and U.S. Navy Collaborate on Biofuels

Maersk and the U.S. Navy collaborate on biofuel initiative. Maersk and the U.S. Navy are testing algae-based biofuel on the container ship Maersk Kalmar. The ship is en route from Northern Europe to India. Maersk Kalmar has two key attributes that make it a suitable vessel for biofuel testing. The 300 meter-long container ship has a dedicated auxiliary test engine, which reduces the risks of testing, and its fuels system has a special biofuel blending equipment and separate tanks.

Danish Shipowners: On Growth track in Wake of Economic Crisis

Denmark has retained its position as one of the world's leading maritime nations, despite the economic crisis. In terms of operated tonnage, Denmark is today the fifth largest maritime nation in the world. In all, Danish shipping companies transport some 10% of the world trade. Henrik Segercrantz reports on Danish maritime issues. Danish shipping is global, with trade within Europe counting for only a quarter of the industry’s total revenues. The primary markets are the US and China, making up more than 15 percent of the revenues. "Here in Denmark the shipping sector is really a success.