Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Energy Efficiency Design News

Pic: International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)

Shipping to Halve Carbon Footprint by 2050

The world's principal shipping organisation, representing around 80% of the world’s merchant tonnage, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)  remains confident that shipping will improve its carbon efficiency by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 2008, in line with the UN International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This follows important decisions made by the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 74) which met in London this week…

MS Viikki: the world’s first LNG-fueled bulk carrier (Photo: Yaskawa Environmental Energy / The Switch)

Ice and Easy: The next level of hybridization

The demanding conditions of the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia are plain sailing for MS Viikki, the world’s first LNG-fueled bulk carrier. The solution, built around WE Tech’s variable frequency drive technology WE Drive and The Switch direct drive permanent magnet shaft generator, helps the vessel achieve Ice Class 1A propulsion, while still slashing fuel consumption, costs and emissions. It is a game-changer for ice-class operations.Demanding high standardsESL Shipping is…

Logo: ClassNK

ClassNK Releases “PrimeShip-GREEN/ProSTA ver.ITTC”

ClassNK released “PrimeShip-GREEN/ProSTA ver.ITTC” on November 1, 2018. ClassNK says that it is the world’s first software that calculates and analyzes a ship’s speed for Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) calculation in compliance with the latest International Towing Tank Conference (ITTC) 2017 Guidelines (ITTC Recommended Procedures and Guidelines 7.5-04-01-01.1, Preparation, Conduct and Analysis of Speed/Power Trials; 2017) for EEDI verification.MARPOL Annex VI states one parameter for calculating the EEDI of a ship’s speed in calm sea conditions based on speed trial results.

Pic: Wärtsilä Corporation

Project Forward Initiative Cuts CO2 Emissions

The Project Forward initiative led by Athens-Based Arista Shipping, with Wärtsilä as one of the participants, demonstrates that with LNG as fuel, an advanced hull design, and highly efficient propulsion machinery, it will be possible to meet the IMO’s target for a 40 percent reduction in carbon intensity by 2030.Model tests of the Project’s concept vessel indicate that the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) is well below the currently most stringent Phase III level. The EEDI reflects the CO2 emissions per transport work and is a measure of carbon intensity.

Exmar’s new very large gas carriers will feature Wärtsilä technology that enables them to operate on LPG fuel. (Photo: Exmar)

Wärtsilä Wins First ‘LPG as Fuel’ Order for New Gas Carriers

Wärtsilä will provide an integrated cargo handling and fuel gas system for two new liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) carriers for Belgium-based owner Exmar. The 80,000m³ very large gas carriers are being built at HHIC-Philippines (Hanjin Heavy Industries & Construction Philippines) in Subic Bay, and will be the first vessels capable of running on LPG, according to Wärtsilä, who secured the order in July 2018.Wärtsilä, which offers ‘LPG as fuel’ as a fully integrated part of the cargo handling system…

(Image: Arista Shipping)

Eniram Signs On LNG Powered Bulk Carrier Project

The Project Forward initiative, which is led by Athens-based Arista Shipping, has produced an energy efficient dry bulk carrier vessel that features liquefied natural gas (LNG) propulsion.Finnish clean-tech software engineering company Eniram, a Wärtsilä company, said it has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to assist in the development of monitoring and optimization tools.“Our input will help ensure that operational visibility will be maximized, and that the new ships can operate at optimal efficiency…

©Philip Plisson, courtesy CMA CGM

LNG: Maritime's Fuel of the Future

The move to LNG as fuel in the maritime sector picks up steam, as CMA CGM announced plans to outfit nine of its new 22,000 TEU containerships with LNG fueled engines. A trend that started in the United States is spreading to the world, as global containershipping giant CMA CGM announced its intention to outfit its series of new 22,000 TEU containerships with LNG-fueled engines. The move to ‘clean fuel’ in the maritime sector has been rapid, spurred by new rules from the International…

Photo: Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

Mitsubishi, Wärtsilä Joins for Improved Power and Propulsion Solution

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Marine Machinery & Equipment Co., LTD (MHI-MME) and the smart technology group Wärtsilä have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) regarding the commercial marketing of a new energy solution for ships. The solution combines innovative technologies from both companies to produce greater power generation capacity and higher propeller propulsion for marine vessels. By integrating MHI-MME's waste heat recovery and energy saving power generation system (WHRS) with Wärtsilä's operational control technology for shaft generator systems…

WinGD X-DF engine with low-pressure gas admission (Photo: WinGD)

Engines Selected for CMA CGM’s LNG Mega Ships

WinGD X-DF engines will power CMA CGM’s record setting containerships. French shipping line CMA CGM has chosen WinGD’s largest, 92 cm bore, dual-fuel low-speed engine to power its series of groundbreaking box ships – presently the largest on order globally, and the first ultra large container vessels with capable of running on liquefied natural gas (LNG). The series of nine ultra-large 22,000 TEU capacity containerships will be built at Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding (Group) Co., Ltd.

(Source: ©DonWilson / CMA CGM)

World First: LNG to Fuel Largest Containerships

The move to LNG as fuel in the maritime sector picks up steam, as CMA CGM announced plans to outfit nine of its new 22,000 TEU containerships with LNG fueled engines. A trend that started in the United States is spreading to the world, as global containershipping giant CMA CGM announced its intention to outfit its series of new 22,000 TEU containerships with LNG-fueled engines. The move to ‘clean fuel’ in the maritime sector has been rapid, spurred by new rules from the International…

Photo courtesy of  Europort

The Environmental Age: What Will Power Future Ships?

What will power the future shipping fleet? What will the future fuel mix be? These questions are being asked with greater frequency in the wake of the Global 2020 Sulphur Cap ruling agreed at the International Maritime Organization and other tightening regulations around air pollution and emissions from shipping operations. The need to take action is, in turn, driving the development and application of innovative alternative power and propulsion technology for ships. From January 1…

Image: T&E

71% of New Box Ships Exceed IMO’s 2025 EEDI -Study

A new study has revealed that nearly three-quarters (71 percent) of all new containerships, which emit around a quarter of global ship CO2 emissions, are already in compliance with the post-2025 requirements of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI). The study, based on analysis of the IMO’s own data and conducted by Transport & Environment (T&E), a founding member of the Clean Shipping Coalition (CSC), also found that the best 10 percent of new containerships are already almost twice as efficient as the requirement for 10 years time.

(Photo Credit: Jadrolinija)

Interferry Mission: Strength from Unity

Interferry CEO Mike Corrigan explains the Stronger Together vision behind the trade association’s drive to extend its networking and lobbying influence. Over the past four decades, Interferry’s reach and purpose has evolved with increasing effect from its U.S. origins in 1976. Back then, it was formed as the International Marine Transit Association with a focus on networking among its members. Now it is highly respected and influential as the only body representing the ferry industry worldwide.

Shell’s gas-to-liquid (GTL) Technology is used to produce high-performance lubricants: pictured is the company’s production facility in Qatar. (Photo: Shell)

IMO 2020: The Future of Fuel

There has been little reaction by way of statements or position papers from marine fuel lubricant manufacturers to the IMO MEPC70 proposals for a global fuel sulfur content cap of 0.5 percent by 2020 but they are fully aware of the implications of the proposed regulations and are taking what could be termed a ‘pragmatic approach’ to fuel regulation compliance. Marine lubricant suppliers have avoided getting involved in the debate as to whether the IMO MEPC70 proposals to reduce permissible marine fuel sulfur content to 0.5 percent or less is good…

(Photo: © scphoto48 / Adobe Stock)

All Eyes on 2020

The International Maritime Organization’s proposals to reduce sulfur levels in marine fuels to a maximum of 0.5 percent m/m (mass/mass) by 2020 may prove to be controversial, having met with various responses from major shipping organisations and other bodies. The decision to implement the proposals by 2020 was taken by IMO, the regulatory authority for international shipping, during its Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 70) meeting, which was held in London, UK in October 2016, and represents a significant reduction from the 3.5 percent m/m global limit currently in place.

Image: Chevron

Asia Pushes LNG as a Bunker Fuel

An increasing number of ships and vessels are using liquefied natural gas or LNG as a clean fuel to comply with the regulations laid by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) across emission control areas. LNG as a ship fuel reduces the emission of sulphur dioxide by 90-95% compared to the conventional petroleum fuels. This factor has propelled the growth of the global LNG bunkering market, says Transparency Market Research (TMR). The market stood at 70 kilo tons in 2013 and is anticipated to expand phenomenally at a CAGR of 63.6% during the period between 2014 and 2025.

WFSV ‘Seacat Intrepid’ built by Alicat – South Boats IOW. Deck layout includes space for ISO containers.

Hybrid Technology for Military and Commercial Vessels

The marine industry is now recognizing the potential of utilizing hybrid power and innovative propulsion systems. Certain maritime sectors are potentially well suited to hybrid systems. These include ferries, pilot boats and workboats that have relatively consistent duty cycles. For military applications, hybrid systems are relevant for patrol, intercept and autonomous vessel duties. Submarines have utilized batteries and stored energy for many years. Diesel/electric systems have long been in use, but these are not hybrid systems.

MV Carl Schulte (Photo: BSM)

Containership Outperforms Environmental Standards

A state-of-the-art containership designed by the Schulte Group to meet the most stringent international environmental standards is already outperforming in terms of design and performance and attracting positive attention in the industry. The 5,400 TEU Carl Schulte, along with its two sister vessels, Christa Schulte and Clemens Schulte, has many environmental features as standard. Her owner Bernhard Schulte, together with her manager Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement (BSM), succeeded…