Thursday, May 28, 2020

Equinor News

Wärtsilä is testing ammonia as a viable fuel for shipping and energy sector applications (Photo: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä Testing Ammonia as a Marine Fuel

As marine operators and euipment manufacturers continue to explore alternative marine fuels as a means to help lower vessel emissions, technology group Wärtsilä said it has initiated combustion trials using ammonia.As part of the tests, ammonia was injected into a combustion research unit to better understand its properties. Based on initial results, the tests will be continued on both dual-fuel and spark-ignited gas engines. These will be followed by field tests in collaboration with ship owners from 2022…

A robot’s battle against emissions: Siemens articulated robots of different sizes assemble battery stacks at Trondheim, Norway. 
Credit: William Stoichevski

Hybrid drives: Siemens sends in the machines

Encouraged by the success of a hybrid drives program, Siemens is going all out in Norway to automate production of that core marine energy storage enabler, the lithium battery. Offshore service vessel charterers, rig owners, ferry operators and ship owners are the target market. Trondheim’s technical university and a recent history of hosting battery makers and system integrators has made it launchpad for new applications involving the new BlueDrive Plus C drives and batteries.Siemens’ Norwegian head of strategy and business development…

The Viking Energy vessel. (Photo: Eidesvik Offshore)

Equinor, Eidesvik in Ammonia-Fueled PSV Pact

Norwegian oil company Equinor has signed a deal with vessel owner Eidesvik Offshore to test the use of carbon-free ammonia as a fuel aboard the Viking Energy platform supply vessel.Equinor has awarded Eidesvik Offshore a five-year contract with effect from April 2020, when the current contract for the vessel expires. The Viking Energy supply vessel will in the contract period be part of a research project developing, installing and testing long-distance sailing fuelled by carbon-free ammonia fuel cells.

AET's Eagle Blane and Eagle Balder were unveiled at a naming ceremony held at the Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) Geoje Shipyard, South Korea, today
(Photo: AET)

Two LNG Dual-Fuel DP Shuttle Tankers Unveiled

AET, a petroleum tanker owner and operator, has named its newest vessels, two of the world's first LNG Dual-Fuel Dynamic Positioning Shuttle Tankers (DPSTs). The vessels, the cleanest DPSTs ever built, will emit 40-48% less carbon than equivalent vessels built in 2008, meeting the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) target of reducing carbon (CO2) emissions by 40% against 2008 baselines by 2030, and halving CO2 emissions by 2050.These LNG Dual-Fuel DPSTs also emit 85% less SOx…

Renderings of a bulk carrier for the transportation of liquefied hydrogen by Moss Maritime, Wilhelmsen Ship Management, Equinor, and DNV-GL. Photo credit: Moss Maritime.

IMO2020: The Rise of Bulk Liquid Hydrogen in Norway

Imagine a power distribution network where excess renewable energy from hydropower, wind, solar, and nuclear energy is converted to hydrogen and used as transportation fuel in the maritime industry. With the allure of a zero emissions fuel, a number of ship owners are starting to seriously consider hydrogen for newly built vessels. As a bold first step, the country of Norway has provided a number of grants to leading maritime companies to conduct feasibility studies into various aspects of this emerging technology sector.

Photo: Corvus Energy

Corvus Energy Expands

Corvus Energy, manufacturer of energy storage systems for maritime applications, announced two production and R&D expansion plans underway in Canada and Norway. The new battery factories will be more modern and more automated than other similar factories, result in eight times the production capacity compared to today.First, the Corvus Energy factory in the Vancouver, Canada region will be expanded and upgraded to house a 200 MWh semi-automated battery production facility. A new product R&D, design and engineering facility will also be developed.