Thursday, November 21, 2019

International Maritime Organization News

Source: DNV GL

Maritime 2050: Facing the Decarbonization Challenge

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) greenhouse gas (GHG) strategy signals a true game changing moment for the shipping industry. External pressure was building, but the IMO strategy sets a time line and goals for shipping to tackle one of the great challenges of our time. The GHG strategy gives our latest Maritime Forecast to 2050 its focus, and with this publication we attempt to set out the different strategies and pathways the industry can take to reach these goals.The first conclusion from the report is a sobering one.

file Image / AdobeStock / © mikes jc

U.S. Scoops up Overseas Fuel Oil in pre-IMO Push

The United States is taking advantage of record-low prices of one of the world's dirtiest fuels by buying record volumes, which it intends to upgrade into cleaner products before new shipping rules take effect, trading and analyst sources say.U.S. trade sources said it recently had become economical to ship fuel oil from countries such as Russia, boosting imports of the product into the United States.This comes even as prices for high-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO) on the U.S. Gulf Coast…

Photo: Viva Energy

Viva Energy Fuels the Future of Shipping

Viva Energy Australia announced the launch of its new very low sulphur fuel oil (VLSFO), developed to meet the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) new regulations on fuel sulphur content.The new regulations will limit the sulphur content in marine fuels to 0.5% from the current level of 3.5%, in a move to reduce sulphur oxide emissions globally. Vessels worldwide will be required to comply by January 1, 2020.The introduction of the IMO’s new sulphur cap on fuels is one…

File Image: A typical Maersk boxship works cargo alongside a pier. (CREDIT: Maersk)

The Quest to Develop IMO 2020 'bio' Fuels

Top shipping, retail and transport companies are looking to develop an alternative marine fuel which aims to reduce carbon emissions from ships, in another step to push the sector to go green.International shipping accounts for 2.2% of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), more than aviation's 2% share.The IMO, a United Nations agency, has said it aims to halve greenhouse gas emissions from 2008 levels by 2050.Investor and activist pressure is prompting companies to look to speed up reducing the industry's carbon footprint.Denmark's A.P.

ExxonMobil Talks With Teekay Ahead of IMO 2020

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) has mandated a global 0.50% cap on the maximum level of sulphur in marine fuel. This new cap represents a significant reduction – down from the current 3.50% limit – and presents the marine industry with compliance challenges.Starting from January 1, 2020, vessel operators will need to use a compliant fuel, or have a scrubber fitted if they wish to continue burning high-sulphur fuel oil. This ruling does not affect Emission Control Areas (ECAs)…

AdobeStock / © dbvirago

Floating Storage for IMO 2020 Fuel builds in Asia

Stockpiles of low-sulphur marine fuels held in floating storage around the Singapore trading and pricing hub are steadily growing ahead of a 2020 global deadline for rules that have shaken the global oil refining and shipping industries.A total of 32 ships, mostly supertankers capable of carrying 300,000 tonnes or more of oil, are currently anchored in Malaysian waters near Singapore accumulating stores of IMO-compliant fuels on board, according to data released by intelligence…

EXXON's Rotterdam Refinery (CREDIT: EXXON)

Oil Stockpiling Builds Ahead of IMO 2020 Rules

S-Oil, South Korea's third-largest refiner, said on Wednesday that regional refining margins are expected to improve in the fourth quarter on the back of inventory build-up ahead of implementation of stricter rules on marine fuels in 2020.The refiner, whose top shareholder is Saudi Aramco, said in an earnings statement, strong demand for heating oil was also expected to support refining margins, along with the International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s stricter shipping fuel…

Photo: Total

Total’s First LNG Bunker Vessel Launched

Total said its first large liquefied natural gas (LNG) bunker vessel has been launched, following the signature of a long-term charter contract between Total and Mitsui O.S.K Lines (MOL) in February 2018.After delivery in 2020, the bunker vessel will operate in Northern Europe, where it will supply LNG to commercial vessels, including 300,000 tons per year for CMA CGM’s nine ultra-large newbuild containerships in Europe-Asia trade, for a period of at least 10 years.The LNG bunker…

Photo: IMO

EU/IMO Global Project Drives Energy Efficiency

The GMN global network of maritime technology cooperation centers has completed numerous pilot projects over the past three years, helping to drive forward the changes which are required to reduce GHG emissions from shipping. A global network of maritime technology cooperation centers has completed an impressive array of pilot projects over the past three years, helping to drive forward the changes which are required to reduce GHG emissions from shipping.Five regional Maritime…

AET's Eagle Blane and Eagle Balder were unveiled at a naming ceremony held at the Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) Geoje Shipyard, South Korea, today
(Photo: AET)

Two LNG Dual-Fuel DP Shuttle Tankers Unveiled

AET, a petroleum tanker owner and operator, has named its newest vessels, two of the world's first LNG Dual-Fuel Dynamic Positioning Shuttle Tankers (DPSTs). The vessels, the cleanest DPSTs ever built, will emit 40-48% less carbon than equivalent vessels built in 2008, meeting the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) target of reducing carbon (CO2) emissions by 40% against 2008 baselines by 2030, and halving CO2 emissions by 2050.These LNG Dual-Fuel DPSTs also emit 85% less SOx…

Pic:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

BWM Convention Modification Enter into Force

The amendments to an international treaty aimed at preventing the spread of potentially invasive species in ships’ ballast water came into force yesterday (October 13), the International Maritime Organization (IMO) said.Ships regularly take on sea water, in tanks, to ensure their stability. Known as ballast water, this can contain many aquatic species, including in microscopic or larval form. These can become invasive and harmful if the ballast water is released, unmanaged, in…

Photo: Freudenberg Sealing Technologies

Fuel Cells for Maritime Shipping

Freudenberg Sealing Technologies will act as a technology partner in the Pa-X-ell2 project. The goal is to develop a new generation of fuel cells for use on seagoing vessels. For the future project on sustainable, CO2-free mobility at sea, the largest shipyard for the construction of cruise ships – Meyer Werft in Papenburg – and the global technology specialist Freudenberg Sealing Technologies intend to equip future generations of cruise ships with fuel cell propulsion. Besides Meyer Werft…

Photo: Maersk Tankers

Cargill, Maersk & Mitsui to Collaborate on Emissions

Cargill, Maersk Tankers and Mitsui & Co. have established a strategic collaboration to accelerate the reduction of global greenhouse gases (GHGs) within shipping. All three parties recognize the urgency required to tackle the global issue of climate change and are continually driving progress in their respective lines of business. Today, they are joining forces to accelerate these efforts and propel the maritime industry towards a more sustainable future.Together, the companies…

Photo: NYK Group

VLCC with New SOx Scrubber Delivered

The very large crude oil carrier (VLCC) Tanzawa, the first new NYK-owned vessel to include an SOx scrubber, has been delivered into the NYK fleet. On October 3, a naming and delivery ceremony was held at the Kure shipyard of Japan Marine United Corporation, and attended by Akira Kono, NYK managing corporate officer, and other related parties.The new vessel is equipped with a scrubber that is compliant with the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) more stringent SOx emission regulation…

Built in South Korea at Hyundai Mipo, Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK Group) has taken delivery of Takaroa Sun. Photo: NYK

Methanol-Fueled Chem Tanker Delivered to NYK

Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK Group) has taken delivery of Takaroa Sun, a methanol carrier equipped with two-stroke dual-fuel engine tech that allows the vessel to be powered by methanol. Built in South Korea at Hyundai MIPO Dockyard, the new ship was funded through NYK’s green financing initiative established to support environment-friendly projects.Takaroa Sun was built with the MAN Energy Solutions second-generation B&W ME-LGIM two-stroke dual-fuel engine that runs on both methanol and conventional marine fuel.

 Image: Bloom Energy

Bloom Energy, Samsung to Design Electric Ships

California-based Bloom Energy, the provider of stationary fuel cells, has announced a collaboration with South Korean shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI), to design and develop ships powered by Bloom Energy’s solid oxide fuel cell technology.SHI aims to be the first shipbuilder to deliver a large cargo ship for ocean operation powered by fuel cells running on natural gas. Such an innovation will play a key role in helping the company exceed the 50 percent emissions reduction target…

© Yaniv / Adobe Stock

Shipping Sector Sets Course for Zero Carbon

Leading ports, banks, oil and shipping companies on Monday launched an initiative which aims to have ships and marine fuels with zero carbon emissions on the high seas by 2030, in another step by the maritime sector to reduce CO2.International shipping accounts for 2.2% of global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and the U.N.'s International Maritime Organization (IMO), has a long-term goal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050.Achieving this target will…

File Image / AdobeStock / © dbvirago

New Ship Emission Regs: Dirty Fuel Down but Not Out

Asia's spot premium for 380-centistoke (cst) high-sulphur fuel oil (HSFO) is expected to ease gradually from its recent record highs as shippers adopt cleaner marine fuels next year to meet new, tougher rules on emissions from ships.But as the deadline approaches, analysts and traders agree that demand for the dirtier HSFO will not die out completely as an increasing number of ships get equipped with sulphur-cleaning devices in the coming years to combat pollution.Starting Jan.