Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Japan News

Rolls-Royce Gas Turbine Selected for Japan’s New Frigate

Rolls-Royce reports it has been selected to supply its MT30 gas turbine to power a new class of frigates for the Japan Maritime Self Defence Force (JMSDF).The selection means Japan is the fifth nation to select the MT30 for a major naval shipbuilding program.Sam Cameron, Rolls-Royce, Senior Vice President – Defence, said, “Japan’s selection of the MT30 is very significant and means that the three largest users of marine gas turbines, have all endorsed the capabilities of the MT30…

A six-cylinder in-line version of the Wärtsilä 50DF dual-fuel engine. (Image: Wärtsilä)

Wärtsilä Supporting Japan's 'Gas Age' Shipping

A total of 16 new gas carrier ships being built in Japan for Japanese owners are to be powered by Wärtsilä dual-fuel engines capable of running on liquefied natural gas (LNG) or conventional diesel fuels. Wärtsilä's said its experience and technological capabilities in gas fuelled propulsion solutions were cited as being key factors in the award of these contracts – all placed between the second half of 2014 and December 2015. The orders specify 20 nine-cylinder, 25 six-cylinder and 16 eight-cylinder Wärtsilä 50DF dual-fuel engines…

Photo courtesy of Man Diesel & Turbo

MAN Diesel & Turbo Inks Deal with Japan’s JFE

Japanese engine manufacturer JFE has entered a new cooperation agreement with MAN Diesel & Turbo for MAN's 32/44CR, 35/44DF, 48/60CR and 51/60DF modern four-stroke engine types. The agreement applies to marine newbuild projects for ships to be deployed on Japanese domestic trade routes, and where the shipyards and shipowners involved are located in Japan. JFE has produced and supplied medium-speed diesel engines since 1964 under the SEMT Pielstick license, which was acquired by the MAN Group back in 2006.

Photo courtesy of Becker Marine Systems

Becker Marine Systems Eyes Growth in Asia

Becker Marine Systems says it is continuing its successful entry into Asian countries such as China, Japan and South Korea, despite an ongoing crisis in the shipbuilding industry. Now the Hamburg-based company is opening a branch office in Kobe, Japan, and has formed a manufacturing partnership with Murakami Iron Works for producing containership rudders. Becker Marine Systems has had a presence in the Asian maritime industry for decades. Recently the company delivered the largest flap rudder in the world.

L250/V250 Marine Diesel Engine (Image: GE)

GE Exhibits Latest Innovations at Sea Japan

At Sea Japan 2016, GE will showcase its latest marine technologies, helping Japanese shipyards and mariners achieve more efficient maritime operations while meeting stringent environmental regulations. GE’s Marine Solutions business has been a reliable partner of the country’s marine industry. In the military space, Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) has chosen GE’s LM2500 and LM500 gas turbines for its naval ships. To date, GE’s marine systems’ supplier IHI has packaged, tested and delivered over 70 LM2500 and more than 30 LM500 marine gas turbines.

Photo: GE Marine Solutions

GE Gas Turbines Power Japanese Destroyer

GE's Marine Solutions reports that the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force (JMSDF) commissioned its second Izumo-class helicopter-carrying destroyer. The new JS Kaga (DDH 184) is powered by four GE LM2500 marine gas turbines, and was commissioned at the Japan Marine United Corporation shipyard in Yokohama on March 22, 2017. First-in-class JS Izumo (DDH 183) and JS Kaga are the largest surface combatants in the JMSDF fleet. Both feature a powerful and reliable combined diesel and LM2500 gas turbine propulsion system, with the gas turbines using GE’s integrated electronic controls.

THE FIRST METHANOL-FUELED OCEAN-GOING VESSEL Photo (courtesy Methanex)

Korea, Japan Welcome First Methanol-Fueled Vessels

Starting on April 18, Waterfront Shipping Company Ltd. (WFS), Marinvest/Skagerack Invest (Marinvest), Westfal-Larsen Management (WL), and Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL) attended the traditional ship naming ceremonies and took delivery of the first Korean and Japanese built methanol-fueled ocean tankers, the Lindanger, Mari Jone and Taranaki Sun. Hyundai Mipo Dockyard hosted the Korean ship naming ceremony, while Minaminippon Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. hosted the Japanese ceremony; where all three of these 50,000 dead weight tonne vessels were built.

Photo: MAN Diesel & Turbo

Japan, Korea Welcome Methanol-fueled Tankers

Starting on April 18, Waterfront Shipping Company Ltd. (WFS), Marinvest/Skagerack Invest (Marinvest), Westfal-Larsen Management (WL), and Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, Ltd. (MOL) attended the traditional ship naming ceremonies and took delivery of the first Korean and Japanese built methanol-fueled ocean tankers, the Lindanger, Mari Jone and Taranaki Sun. Hyundai Mipo Dockyard hosted the Korean ship naming ceremony, while Minaminippon Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. hosted the Japanese ceremony; where all three of these 50,000 dead weight tonne vessels were built.

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

Photo courtesy of GE Marine

GE Gas Turbines for Japan's New Warship

GE's Marine Solutions announced it will provide IHI, Tokyo, Japan, with two LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbines for the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force's (JMSDF) new 8,200-ton class Aegis destroyer. “GE's LM family of gas turbines are already part of numerous JMSDF ships, most recently the Izumo-class DDH helicopter carriers and 5,000-ton class destroyer programs,” said Brien Bolsinger, Vice President, Marine Operations, GE, Evendale, Ohio. “By using our marine gas turbines, the JMSDF benefits from long term support, operational efficiency and commonality within their fleet.

Image: GE

GE Gas Turbines for Japan’s New Destroyer

GE Marine will provide IHI, Tokyo, Japan, with two LM2500 aeroderivative marine gas turbines for the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force’s (JMSDF) new 26DD destroyer. “GE gas turbines already are part of numerous JMSDF ship classes, most recently the 22DDH, which is already commissioned, and the 24DDH, which is now under construction,” said Brien Bolsinger, Vice President Marine Operations, GE Marine, Evendale, Ohio. “As with previous contracts, IHI will handle in-country design, manufacture and testing of the LM2500 propulsion modules for the 26DD program.

© John Wollwerth / Adobe Stock

New Study Looks at LNG Bunkering for Car Carriers

To help promote liquefied natural gas (LNG) bunkering in Asia, the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) and the Ports and Harbors Bureau of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport, and Tourism of Japan (MLIT) will helm a working group to conduct a feasibility study on LNG bunkering for car carriers plying between Japan and Singapore. This working group will include Japan’s big three shippers – Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha (K Line), Nippon Yusen Kaisha (NYK) and Mitsui O.S.K. Lines (MOL).

'K' Line Collaboration Eyes Japan’s First LNG-fueled Ferry

Kawasaki Kinkai Kisen Kaisha, Ltd. (“K” Line Kinkai) and Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Ltd. (“K” Line) have agreed to work on joint study for “K” Line Kinkai’s newbuilding passenger ferry being fueled by LNG, whose study includes specifications, engine types and any related technical verifications for LNG handling. “K” Line Kinkai has been studying introduction of a ferry fueled by LNG, an environmentally-friendly energy that could almost completely eliminates SOx emissions and also minimizes NOx and CO2 emissions to certain level…

Photo: NYK Line

Award for Japan's First LNG-fueled Tugboat

NYK Line received award sponsored by the Japan Federation of Freight Industries (JFFI) recognizing the environmental load reduction achieved by Japan's first LNG-fueled tugboat, Sakigake. This is the third time since 2009 that NYK has been honored at this annual awards ceremony. NYK has been conducting technical research and development on the use of LNG to fuel ships in order to meet the tightened regulations on CO2 emissions from vessels. Sakigake, which was delivered in August 2015 and comes equipped with dual-fuel engines that can use either LNG or diesel oil…

Japan - Australian submarines

Japan Offers to Build Australian Subs

Australia has reportedly welcomed a Japanese offer to jointly-build a fleet of new submarines, with a possible deal by the end of the year, according to a report on http://zeenews.india.com. Japan is proposing jointly building Australia`s new submarines, instead of exporting a new fleet, an AFP report said on Monday quoting a Japanese daily, after concerns in Canberra over the effect on the domestic ship-building industry. Under the proposal, Japan`s defence ministry is to cooperate with Australia in developing special steel and other materials for its new submarines…

Image: Eco Marine Power

Japan Grants Patent for EnergySail

The Japan Patent Office has granted a patent to Eco Marine Power (EMP) for its innovative EnergySail technology, an advanced rigid sail device that can be fitted with a range of renewable energy technologies such as solar panels or wind power devices. With the patent in place, EMP can now begin licensing the technology to proceed so that commercial production of the sail and associated technologies can begin in 2018. A unique renewable energy platform, EnergySail has been designed specifically…

Two GE LM2500 marine gas turbines power the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Forces (JMSDF) newest destroyer JS Asahi (DD119).  Photo: GE

GE Gas Turbines for Japan’s JS Asahi Destroyer

Two GE LM2500 marine gas turbines power the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Forces (JMSDF) newest destroyer JS Asahi (DD119). This first of two new destroyers in the JMSDF’s Asahi-class destroyer program was recently commissioned by the JMSDF. The ship was built by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) at its Nagasaki Shipyard & Machinery Works in Japan. “We work in concert with IHI, our longstanding partner in Japan, to supply LM2500 marine gas turbines to the JMSDF for this new destroyer and other surface combatant programs,” said GE’s Brien Bolsinger, Vice President, Marine Operations.

(Photo courtesy Intrernational Transport Forum)

Japan: An LNG Bunkering Hub?

New study examines Japanese government strategy for creating infrastructure for environmentally-friendly ship fuel.A new report by the Intrernational Transport Forum at the OECD assesses Japan’s ambition to become an international bunkering hub for liquefied natural gas (LNG).The Japanese government is working to position the nation as a LNG bunkering hub as it expects the fuel's significance in shipping to grow.Japan is already the world’s largest importer of LNG by a large margin.