Monday, August 3, 2020

Kentucky News

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Vitol Invests in Coal-to-oil Venture as Shipping Fuel Rules Loom

Energy trader Vitol and coal miner Peabody Energy are partnering with start-up Arq to turn coal waste into a low-sulphur oil product that could be an alternative fuel for shippers as new U.N. pollution rules loom, the companies said in a statement.Global oil and shipping companies are looking at any and all options to avoid becoming a casualty of the major market dislocations that the new standards will create when they come into effect in 2020.The U.N. International Maritime Organization (IMO) will ban ships using fuel with a sulphur content higher than 0.5 percent…

U.S. Navy forces and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force routinely train together to improve interoperability and readiness to provide stability and security for the Indo-Asia Pacific region. (U.S. Navy photo by Z.A. Landers)

US Navy: Bigger is Better, but at What Cost?

The U.S. Navy has a balanced fleet, but it wants to grow bigger and better. Will the budget allow both? Maritime Reporter's March 2017 cover story on the U.S. Navy was all about the numbers. There exists several plans to grow the fleet beyond the current number of 308 ships, the Mitre recommendation of 414 ships, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessment 340-ship proposal, and the Navy’s decision to grow the fleet to 355 ships, and the Trump administration’s 350. With so many numbers being bandied about, there are even more suggestions on how to get there.

Distributor CK Power Grows Kubota Engine Region

CK Power said it has been awarded exclusive Kubota engine distributorship for Oklahoma and North Texas, adding to its existing territory of Eastern Missouri, Arkansas, Southern Illinois, Western Kentucky and Western Tennessee. A Kubota distributor for over 30 years, CK Power will support the new territory though its Oklahoma City location, with plans to open a Texas service and sales location in the latter part of 2017. CK Power’s product offering ranges from standard generator sets and power units for any application/ market to custom engineered packages for OEM’s…

(Photo: Thrustmaster of Texas, Inc.)

MN100: Thrustmaster of Texas, Inc.

Thrustmaster builds a complete line of Z-Drive azimuthing thrusters from 500 HP to 4,000 HP for the inland towboat industry specifically designed to endure the demanding conditions when operating in brown water. Using Z-Drives on towboats results in substantially improved fuel efficiency, shorter trip times, decreased maintenance downtime and higher customer satisfaction when compared to traditional shaft and rudder installations. All thrusters are developed in-house by a complete engineering department for mechanical, hydraulic, electrical and electronic design.

Scania Bolsters Inland River Distribution

NRE Power Systems, who currently represents Scania’s latest marine platform: 13- and 16-liter engines for auxiliary and propulsion applications; and currently distributes them in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Arkansas, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky and Texas, will now represent West Virginia, southern Ohio, southern Indiana and southern Illinois.   NRE is also a distributor for Scania industrial engines and distributes them in Louisiana, Arkansas and Mississippi.

Left to right: Blake Nagim, Rick Granger and Jesse Cuevas participating in the Steyr Motors training session

Laborde Now a Steyr Motors Distributor

To help increase business and provide even better service for its customers, Laborde Products has been chosen as a Steyr Motors distributor. The company will offer sales, service and support throughout Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin. Laborde will also offer dealer support along the Eastern seaboard of Mexico, from the Texas border to Cancun. Steyr Motors M1 Monoblock engines are known for the lowest weight in class at less than 1.2 kg/hp and the highest power density, up to 92 hp/ltr.

Tugboat Named For Long-serving Vulcan Employee

US company Vulcan Materials christens new tugboat 'Hazel Demery' in honor of nurse with 58 years of company service. The new tugboat for the company's Grand Rivers facility is named for Hazel Demery, a prominent figure in the Grand Rivers community. Mrs. Demery was guest of honor at the christening ceremony held at Vulcan's harbor, which is adjacent to the Kentucky Dam & Locks. Beginning in 1951, Mrs. Demery worked as a nurse for Reed Crushed Stone, which was acquired by Vulcan in 1990. Mrs. Demery continued working for Vulcan until she retired in 2009 with 58 years of service.

21 Relentless fire, rescue, and patrol vessel

Metal Shark Delivers Fire/Rescue Boat

21 Relentless Delivered to Pendleton Rescue Squad. Metal Shark Boats has completed delivery of a 21 Relentless fire, rescue, and patrol vessel for Pendleton Rescue Squad's operations in Kentucky. A custom-built derivative of the U.S. Coast Guard's SPC-SW standard platform response vessel, the boat will serve as the Squad's primary rescue and firefighting vessel. A sister craft has also been built as a demonstration platform for Metal Shark's sales team, and is currently available for testing nationwide.

Company Earns Recognition for Seventh Consecutive Year

Honda Marine Customer Satisfaction Index Award

Honda Marine announced that it has received the Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI) Award for Excellence in Customer Satisfaction for outboard engines in 2010 from the National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA). This award marks the seventh consecutive year that Honda Marine has secured the honor. The NMMA will formally recognize this year’s award recipients at the upcoming International Boat Builder's Exhibition (IBEX) show and conference, scheduled for September 28 - 30 at the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Kentucky.

George Crounse Sr.’s aunt, Alice R. Strowbridge, christened her namesake, the M/V Alice. She stands with George Crounse Sr., his wife Eleanor and their son George Jr. (Photo courtesy Crounse Corp.)

Ingram and Crounse: Towing History into the Present

If towboats and barges hurtled passed the average American on their way to work every morning, the industry would be better known. If commuters had to deal with failed locks the way they have to deal with congested freeways, political support for the river industry’s infrastructure would be easier to come by. Instead, towing vessels and their crews go about their work in relative obscurity. The general public sees towboats and barges as historic relics from Sam Clemens’ time and less so an integral part of the modern American economy.