Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Marine Environment Protection Committee News

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Shipping's Share of Global Carbon Emissions Increases

Carbon emissions from shipping rose in the six-year period to 2018 and accounted for 2.89% of the world’s CO2, a study released on Tuesday showed, amid growing pressure on the industry to bring levels down.About 90% of world trade is transported by sea and UN shipping agency - the IMO - aims to reduce the industry’s overall greenhouse gas emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050.The report - the fourth in a series commissioned by the IMO - said shipping's share of global CO2 emissions increased to 2.89% in 2018 from 2.76% in 2012, when the last study period ended.CO2 emissions grew to 1,056 m

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Ship Emissions: ABS Spearheads the Future of EEDI for Ships

A team led by ABS has been awarded a contract by the European Commission (EC) to explore future directions for the IMO’s Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) for ships.The landmark study will look at ways to improve and accelerate the integration of low-carbon fuels and innovative technologies into the requirements of the index, which was originally created to reduce emissions from ships by promoting design improvements and the adoption of more energy-efficient power systems.The EC…

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$5B Fund Proposed for Emissions R&D

Shipping associations have proposed creating a research fund with $5 billion raised by the industry to develop technology to help the sector meet U.N. targets on cutting emissions.The global shipping fleet, which accounts for 2.2% of the world's CO2 emissions, is under pressure to reduce those emissions and other pollution. About 90% of world trade is transported by sea.International shipping associations called on Wednesday for a mandatory contribution of $2 per tonne on fuel used by ships to raise money for a research fund to help develop cleaner technology for the industry.U.N.

File Photo: Caterpillar

Marine Engines Market: $14.4Bln by 2026

The global marine engines market is estimated to grow at CAGR above 4.5% over the forecast time frame 2019 to 2026 and reach the market value around $14.4 billion by 2026.The shifting trends in the shipping industry and the increase of worldwide amounts of sea trade are projected to fuel the development of the market in marine motors, said a report by Acumen Research and Consulting.Increased use of low-sulfur fuels due to public emissions reduction standards will fuel demand for the item.

Pic: International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)

Shipping to Halve Carbon Footprint by 2050

The world's principal shipping organisation, representing around 80% of the world’s merchant tonnage, International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)  remains confident that shipping will improve its carbon efficiency by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 2008, in line with the UN International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This follows important decisions made by the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 74) which met in London this week…

David Pascoe (Photo: LISCR)

Liberia Calls for Early Reporting on 2020-compliant Fuel Availability

Liberia has submitted a paper to the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) calling for early reporting on the availability of fuel oil that is compliant with the new 0.50 percent global fuel oil sulphur limit well in advance of January 1, 2020, the effective date the new fuel oil must be used on board ships.David Pascoe, Senior VP, Maritime Operations and Standards, Liberian International Ship & Corporate Registry (LISCR), the U.S.-based manager of the Liberian Registry…

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The Global 0.50% Sulfur Cap: 30 months and counting down …

Industry frets about the coming deadline. Shipping desperately wants to be ready, but will global shore-based infrastructure and refining capacity match the demand that is sure to come? And … are regulators listening to industry’s concerns?In early June, the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a public workshop in Washington to help the agencies prepare for the January 1, 2020 deadline for worldwide implementation of very low sulfur marine…

Image: International Chamber of Shipping

ICS Encouraged by 2020 Global Sulphur Cap Progress

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) says it is encouraged by efforts made by IMO Member States to resolve some pressing practical challenges ahead of the global implementation of the 0.5 percent sulphur in fuel cap on January 1, 2020.Speaking after an IMO working group meeting last week, to which the industry submitted a number of constructive proposals to help ensure smooth and consistent implementation, ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe, remarked, “Although there is still much work to be done, last week’s IMO discussions were positive.

Image: Sustainable Shipping Initiative

Zero Emission Ships: Comparing Fuel Choices

There's a new report out from the Sustainable Shipping Initiative (SSI) -- authorted by Lloyds Register (LR) and University Maritime Advisory Services (UMAS) -- that examines different fuel options and costs as increasingly the world's oceangoing fleet is pushed toward decarbonization. As a back drop, as Mariitme Reporter & Engineering News reports in its May 2018 edition with its cover feature interview with Kitack Lim, Secretary General of the International Mariitme Organization (IMO), the IMO mandate is to cut emissions 50% by 2050, as agreed in mid-April 2018, as compared to 2008 levels.

(Photo: Tuukka Ervasti)

Viking Line: Using Wind Power to Cut Ship Emissions

As the commercial maritime community is collectively pressed by international and regional regulation to cut emissions, news today from Viking Line proves action as Viking Grace -- which is already fueled by LNG -- has become the first passenger ship in the world to use a rotor sail for wind-assisted propulsion. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations shipping arm, agreed in mid-April to cut carbon emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 as compared to 2008 levels, and is a continuation of the push for decarbonization in the Maritime Sector.

Laura Langh-Lagerlof  (Photo: Langh Tech)

Langh Tech Warns of Sulphur Fuel Carriage Ban Impact

Finland-based exhaust gas cleaning firmLangh Tech has explained how last week’s decision to prohibit the carriage of noncompliant fuel oil will have a material and technical impact on commercial ship operations.In a special panel session during the Sulphur Cap 2020 conference in Amsterdam, Langh Tech Managing Director Laura Langh-Lagerlof told delegates, “If such measures are adopted, any shipowner, operator, master mariner or chief engineer found guilty of transporting noncompliant…

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Emissions Regulations Present Strategic Opportunity

The marine industry as a whole is responsible for about 2.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Shipbuilders and fleet owners have spent the last two decades adjusting to shifting emissions regulations since the introduction of the MARPOL Convention 1997 Protocol, which included specific regulations for the reduction of air pollution from marine vessels. Since then, there have been additions and amendments to ensure that the industry is doing its bit to better support the environment, with the latest regulation pulling forward lower caps in global emissions.

File Photo: European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA)

European Shipowners Discuss Emissions Reductions

In the European Shipowners’ seminar on CO2 reductions in the shipping industry one message was clear: in order to achieve CO2 reductions across the world merchant fleet, a combination of different measures is needed. “In our seminar this week, we discussed with our stakeholders and European decision-makers different measures that enable to minimise the environmental impact of the shipping sector. In one analysis, the measures were divided in categories including the Technical and operational measures…

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Breaking Down IMO’s 0.5% Bunker Sulfur Cap

Breaking down the challenges of the 2020 sulfur cap can be confusing. Matti Bargfried provides a primer. What has happened so far? The IMO this October voted in its 70th session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee to globally cap the maximum amount of sulfur allowed to 0.5 percent. HFO will be further allowed (there is no mandate to disallow usage) provided it meets the set standards. Alternative measurements like scrubbers are also accepted to reduce the ship emissions.

A Wärtsilä V-SOx Scrubber being installed on board the MV Tarago. (Photo: Wärtsilä)

New Fuel Regs Drive Scrubber Business

The Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems Association and its members are preparing to meet higher demand for gas scrubbing systems to bring SOx emissions in line with the targets set by the IMO’s 2020 fuel sulfur content proposals. As previously reported by this correspondent in Maritime Reporter and Engineering News (December 2016 issue, page 24; January 2017 issue, page 28), the IMO has come in for some severe criticism over its proposals to introduce a global marine fuels sulfur content cap of 0.5 percent (mass/mass) by the year 2020.

Ambassador Diaz of Panama presents the certificate (Photo: K Line)

Panama Certifies Japanese Scrubber System

For almost a year Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, Ltd. ("K" Line), Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) and Mitsubishi Kakoki Kaisha, Ltd. (MKK) have been performing tests aboard an operational ship of a newly-developed "Hybrid SOx Scrubber System" for removing sulfur oxides (SOx) from the exhaust gas emitted by marine diesel engines. The testing results have now verified that the system's effectiveness in curbing emissions of air pollutants complies with international regulations, and the system has been officially approved by the Republic of Panama, the country where the test ship is registered.

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All Eyes on 2020

The International Maritime Organization’s proposals to reduce sulfur levels in marine fuels to a maximum of 0.5 percent m/m (mass/mass) by 2020 may prove to be controversial, having met with various responses from major shipping organisations and other bodies. The decision to implement the proposals by 2020 was taken by IMO, the regulatory authority for international shipping, during its Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 70) meeting, which was held in London, UK in October 2016, and represents a significant reduction from the 3.5 percent m/m global limit currently in place.

Two New SEA\LNG Partners

SEA\LNG, which works to accelerate the widespread adoption of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as a marine fuel, has welcomed two new partners, each representing key aspects of the LNG maritime value chain: ABS and Keppel Offshore & Marine’s Gas Technology Development. The recent decision by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPS) to enforce the global 0.5 percent cap on the sulphur content of marine fuel by 2020 has significantly increased interest in LNG as a cost effective, safe and more environmentally friendly fuel.