Sunday, February 17, 2019

Port State Control News

Photo: Aderco

IMO 2020: Aderco Advises "Plan Ahead"

Aderco is reminding ship owners, ship managers and operators that they should already have started planning to comply with the IMO’s 2020 global sulphur cap.Olivier Baiwir, CEO of Aderco, believes some in the maritime industry perceive the start of the cap as being nearly a year away but they need to rethink that position and quickly to ensure they will be compliant with the new regulations..“The IMO sulphur cap starts on January 1, 2020 but in reality the planning for compliance is just over a month away.

Image: International Chamber of Shipping

ICS Encouraged by 2020 Global Sulphur Cap Progress

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) says it is encouraged by efforts made by IMO Member States to resolve some pressing practical challenges ahead of the global implementation of the 0.5 percent sulphur in fuel cap on January 1, 2020.Speaking after an IMO working group meeting last week, to which the industry submitted a number of constructive proposals to help ensure smooth and consistent implementation, ICS Secretary General, Peter Hinchliffe, remarked, “Although there is still much work to be done, last week’s IMO discussions were positive.

© gcammarata / Adobe Stock

Breaking Down IMO’s 0.5% Bunker Sulfur Cap

Breaking down the challenges of the 2020 sulfur cap can be confusing. Matti Bargfried provides a primer. What has happened so far? The IMO this October voted in its 70th session of the Marine Environment Protection Committee to globally cap the maximum amount of sulfur allowed to 0.5 percent. HFO will be further allowed (there is no mandate to disallow usage) provided it meets the set standards. Alternative measurements like scrubbers are also accepted to reduce the ship emissions.

Lagersmit Launches Oil Collector Ring

Lagersmit has launched the Oil Collector Ring which prevents oil leakage into the engine room. A clean engine room provides safety. The Oil Collector Ring (OCR) prevents oil droplets or mist from the stern tube and the forward seal entering the engine room. The OCR is applicable to all Supreme seals both new and delivered models. Wear at the stern tube seal which is located in the engine room may cause emission of oil. Sometimes emission is limited to mist. When the wear is heavy drops of oil will enter the engine room.

Photo: Johan Ramberg

Sulphur Experts to Meet in Denmark

Experts from all Sulphur Emission Control Area (SECA) countries will meet in Denmark on February 25 and 26 to find solutions to the legal and technical challenges presented by the stricter sulphur regulations, the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) informed. Representatives from all 16 SECA countries and the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) will meet at the Konventum Conference Centre in Elsinore for a workshop arranged by the DMA aiming to bridge the gap between the creation and enforcement of sulphur regulations.

Image: DMA

International Sulphur Campaign Launched

An international information campaign on the new, stricter sulphur requirements and their enforcement will be launched in February and, at the same time, cooperation between the so-called SECA countries is further strengthened, Tthe Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) announced. In February, there will be increased focus on the stricter sulphur limits that took effect on January 1, 2015 in the 16 Sulphur Emission Control Areas (SECA countries). All these countries, which include Russia, the U.S.

KR Launches Software to Aid ECA Compliance

The Korean Register (KR) has launched an in-house developed software program to assist vessels with fuel oil change over when complying with the new low sulphur regulations. From January 1, MARPOL Annex VI Reg 14 requires vessels sailing within an emission control area (ECA) to burn fuel with a sulphur content of 0.1% or less. This means that ships must switch from normal fuel to low sulphur fuel before entering the restricted zone. KR’s new software assesses fuel consumption at actual operating speed to calculate the time required to completely switch to a low sulphur fuel.

Simon Bennett

Ships Must Prepare for Sulphur Rules

The shipping industry is fully committed to total compliance with the 0.1% sulphur in fuel requirements, in Emission Control Areas, from January 2015. And there is no reason to suggest that there will not be full compliance, says the industry’s global trade association, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS). “But there is nevertheless concern amongst those owners who know that they themselves will comply but who may worry about their competitors” said ICS Director of Policy & External Relations…

MV Argo Merchant was a Liberian-flagged oil tanker that ran aground and sank southeast of Nantucket Island, Mass., on Dec. 15, 1976, causing one of the largest marine oil spills in history. U.S. Coast Guard Archives

Disasters at Sea & Their Impact on Shipping Regulation

The history of marine safety is soaked in water and written in blood. “I think that most people will tell you that changes in marine safety are almost exclusively disaster-driven,” agrees Dr. Josh Smith, a professor at Kings Point and interim director of the American Merchant Marine Museum. It hasn’t always been that way. Actually, it’s been worse. Despite some efforts early on to exert some control over shipping practices, going to sea has been accepted as a risky undertaking as long as man has floated vessels.

Machinery, general cargo/multipurpose ship, date keel laid 1976.

Old Propulsion Machinery Top Cause of Ship Detentions

68 ships (41% of all detentions) were detained over the 3 month period as a direct result of the CIC for deficiencies related to propulsion and auxiliary machinery. Problem areas included the propulsion of the main engine, cleanliness of the engine room and emergency source of power/emergency generator. In previous years deficiencies related to propulsion and machinery installations accounted on average for 7% of the total number of deficiencies within the Tokyo and Paris MoU´s, ranking number six in comparison with all the deficiencies by categories statistics.

MV Balder leaving Croatia after installation of ECGC inside new funnel

Clean Marine’s EGCS First to Operate Inside ECA

MV Balder, equipped with Exhaust Gas Cleaning System (EGCS) from Clean Marine, is reported to be the first vessel in the world to operate this type of system in the U.S. Emission Control Area (ECA). Upon arrival in Baltimore last week, the vessel’s Master sought approval from the coast guard to enter and exit the ECA Zone using High Sulphur Fuel Oil with EGCS, rather than burning the more expensive Low Sulphur Fuel Oil (1% Sulphur content). Clean Marine invited USCG and EPA to observe the EGCS in operation for compliance with the ECA. Officials from the U.S.

Paris, Tokyo, Indian Ocean and Black Sea Port State Concentrated Inspection

The Paris, Tokyo, Indian Ocean and Black Sea Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) on port state control will carry out a joint concentrated inspection campaign (CIC) to verify compliance with SOLAS Chapter II-1. The CIC will last three months, starting on September 1 and ending on November 30, 2013. The CIC will focus on safety of propulsion and auxiliary machinery, especially the working order and maintenance of main engines, auxiliary engines, auxiliary equipment and their related alarm systems.

CIC on Propulsion & Auxiliary Machinery

A Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on “Propulsion and Auxiliary Machinery” has been announced by the Paris MoU and Tokyo MoU and will commence on 1st September 2013. The 45 Maritime Authorities of the Paris and the Tokyo Memoranda of Understanding on Port State Control (PSC) will begin a joint concentrated inspection campaign with the purpose to ensure compliance with SOLAS Chapter II-1. The duration of this inspection campaign will be three months, ending on 30th November 2013. Members should note that other PSC MoU’s will also carry out a CIC on the same topic during this period.

Maritime Labor Convention 2006 and the U.S.

The Maritime Labor Convention 2006, sponsored by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and better known as MLC 2006, will enter into force on August 20, 2013. It has been ratified by 35 nations as of the date of the preparation of this article, including Australia, Canada, Denmark, Greece, Panama, Singapore and Spain. The United States has not ratified MLC 2006, and it is unclear whether it ever will – not so much as of objection to its various provisions, but more due to sheer inertia.

Public Domain CCO Photo

Ship Fire Safety Still Serious Concern: Paris MOU Survey

Preliminary results from the Concentrated Inspection Campaign (CIC) on Fire Safety Systems, underline fire safety concerns. The results are based on the CIC survey carried out between 1 September 2012 and 30 November 2012 in the Paris MoU region. 103 ships were detained over the 3 month period as a direct result of the CIC for deficiencies related to Fire Safety Systems. 64% of all ships detained in the three month period were detained for fire safety related issues. Problem areas included fire pumps and its pipes, fire fighting equipment and appliances, and the fire control plan.

Mississippi Anchorage Low Water Hazards

New Orleans Port State Control Officers (PSCOs) discover vessels whose rudders may have set into the mud while safely anchored. Masters and/or operators of vessels are reminded of their responsibility, as noted in 46 Code of Federal Regulations 4.05-1, to notify the nearest Coast Guard Sector Office whenever their vessel is involved in a marine casualty which includes any unintended grounding [46 CFR 4.05-1(a)(1)]. In addition, Masters and/or operators of vessels are reminded…

Image credit EPA

Cleaner Maritime Air for North America Comes Soon

On the operative day the sulfur content of the fuel oil used on board ships operating within the ECA may not exceed 1.00 percent m/m (10,000 ppm). The boundaries of the North American ECA are defined in IMO MEPC.1/Circ.723 . The US EPA has issued Interim Guidance on the Non-Availability of Compliant Fuel Oil for the North American ECA and more information is also available on the US EPA website.

The author, Dennis Bryant.

North American Emission Rules for Ships to Enter Force

On 1 August 2012, enforcement of the North American Emissions Control Area (ECA) is due to commence. This third and largest ECA (the other two encompass the North Sea and the Baltic Sea areas) was first proposed by Canada and the United States on 27 March 2009. France quickly joined in on behalf of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, its territory off the Atlantic coast of Canada. The proposal was approved by the IMO on 26 March 2010 by means of an amendment to Annex VI (Regulations for Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships) to the MARPOL Convention.