Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Statoil News

(Photo: Sanmar Shipyard)

LNG: Lagging, Not Gone

Low energy prices, depressed day rates and slow growth of bunkering infrastructure has dampened progress for the marine industry’s ‘white knight’ of environmentally friendly fuels. LNG, nevertheless, is here to stay. Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) is a clean fuel in abundant supply. The green advantages of LNG are well known: Class Society DNV-GL, a pioneer in the commercialization of LNG fueling for maritime applications, offers that use of LNG fuel provides “the complete removal of SOX and particle PM emissions and a reduction of NOX emission of up to 85 percent ...

Photo: Gondan

Gondan Delivers Dual Fuel Tug

After completing its sea trials program, DUX, the first dual fuel tug ever built in Europe, was delivered yesterday to its owner, the Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi A/S. This vessel is the first tugboat of a series of three. Designed by the Canadian company Robert Allan Ltd., the new escort tug, with 40.2 meters length and 16 meters beam, will provide tug services to Norwegian state-owned energy company Statoil, at the far-north terminal located at Melkøya under severe weather conditions.

Photo: Gondán

Dual-fuel Escort Tug for Østensjø Rederi

The first of three new dual fuel RAstar 4000-DF class extreme escort tugs, the Dux, has been delivered to Østensjø Rederi AS by Spanish shipbuilder Astilleros Gondán S.A. Designed by Robert Allan Ltd., the 40.2 meter vessel is the first of a three boat order from Østensjø for severe weather operations at Statoil's Melkøya LNG Gas terminal at Hammerfest in the extreme north of Norway. These escort tugs will conduct approximately 300 LNG ship escorts annually, assist with berthing operations and will be maintained in readiness for emergency services such as long line towing…

Photo: Gondan

Dual Fuel Tug Delivered to Østensjø Rederi

After completing its sea trials program, Pax, the second dual fuel tug ever built in Europe, has been delivered to its owner, the Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi A/S. The first tug of this kind built in Europe, Dux, was delivered by the company last May. The vessel is the first tugboat of a series of three. Built by Spanish shipbuilder Gondan and designed by Canadian company Robert Allan Ltd. the new escort tug, with 40.2 meters length and 16 meters beam, will provide tug services to Norwegian state-owned energy company Statoil…

(Photo: GONDAN)

Third Dual-fuel Tug for Østensjø Rederi

After completing its sea trials, AUDAX, the third dual fuel tug ever built in Europe, has been delivered to its owner, the Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi A/S. The first tug of this kind built in Europe, DUX, was delivered by the company last May, and the second one, PAX, was delivered in July. Designed by Canadian company Robert Allan Ltd. these state-of-the-art vessels, with 40.2 meters length and 16 meters beam, will provide tug services to Norwegian state-owned energy company Statoil, at the far-north terminal located at Melkøya under severe weather conditions.

A hydrogen-powered cruise ship may be modeled on the same design as Viking Cruises’ most recent vessel, the Viking Sun. (Photo: Viking Cruises)

Viking Planning Hydrogen-powered Cruise Ship

Viking Cruises is reportedly working on a project to develop a vessel fuelled by liquid hydrogen that could become the world’s first cruise ship with zero-emission technology, according to the Norwegian Maritime Authority (NMA). NMA said the announcement was made by Viking Cruises project manager Serge Fossati during the Safety at Sea Conference in Haugesund. “This is a world sensation. Very exciting. If they pull this off, a distribution network may be established, which will enable others as well to use hydrogen as fuel…

Photo: Gas4Sea

Statoil Selects Gas4Sea for LNG Bunkering in Rotterdam

Gas4Sea partners - ENGIE, Mitsubishi Corporation and NYK - have been selected by Norwegian multinational energy group Statoil to be their liquefied natural gas (LNG) marine fuel supplier in the port of Rotterdam, in the Netherlands, for four crude shuttle tankers. The four planned dual fuel vessels are to come into service in early 2020 and will be operated by Statoil in Northern European seas. Gas4Sea will supply LNG using the ENGIE Zeebrugge which started operations earlier this year.

(Photo: Gondan)

A New Breed of Tug

When markets expand niches are created, goes the logic. For builders of tugs, that market is “floating gas” and the expanding use of liquefied natural gas, or LNG, as a fuel. In support of LNG, there’ll be more oceangoing tug duty — the new floating storage and regasification units, or FSRUs, mean busier LNG carriers, and LNG cargo owners have an interest in tug escorts that share their “carbon footprint”. Still, new emissions rules offer ways to keep using refinery products, and the work of master tug designers suggests the new breeds of tugs are about more than fuel.

EXMAR’s New VLGCs to Run on LPG

Two very large gas carrier (VLGC) newbuildings being constructed for Belgian owner EXMAR will be equipped with main engines that will use liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as fuel.   Both vessels will be constructed by Hanjin Heavy Industries & Construction at its Subic Bay shipyard in the Philippines for delivery within the third quarter of 2020.   The MAN Diesel & Turbo engines will use part of the onboard LPG cargo for the vessels’ propulsion.   EXMAR has contracted the vessels to serve long-term commitments with Statoil ASA of Norway for worldwide LPG transportation.

(Image: ABB)

ABB to Equip AET's New Shuttle Tankers

ABB said it has won an order from Korean shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries to equip two new 125,000 DWT shuttle tankers contracted to the world's largest offshore operator Statoil ASA. Ordered by petroleum and chemical tanker owner and operator AET and scheduled for delivery in 2019, the vessels will transport oil from the Statoil fields on the Norwegian and U.K. continental shelves to land-based terminals. The two twin-skeg specialist DP2 offshore loading shuttle tankers will feature a range of ABB’s power and automation solutions, including the power distribution system Onboard DC Grid.

Exhaust Economizers: A Silent Contributor to Green Technology

Next generation economizers are being introduced by Ulmatec Pyro. This will carry on the history of 35 years of heat recovery from ship’s exhaust – a technology that’s still unknown for many in the marine industry. You can’t ignore waste energy recovery systems if you want to participate in discussions about efficient marine designs. That statement is based on the fact that most diesel engines on board a vessel still operate on an efficiency scale in the 30 percent range. The remaining 60-70 percent represents losses, converted into heat.

The tankers will feature a Wärtsilä VOC recovery module that will eliminate VOC emissions and enable notable fuel savings. Photo Wartsila

Wärtsilä VOC Recovery for AET Tankers

Wärtsilä will supply its Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) recovery technology, LNG fuel gas handling systems and the auxiliary engines for two new shuttle tankers being built for Singapore based AET Tankers at the Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard in South Korea. The order, worth in total more than $37 million, was booked in January 2018. The ships will operate on Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) as the primary fuel, but VOC – the gas evaporating from the oil cargo tanks – will also be utilised as fuel by mixing it with the LNG, thereby reducing the vessels’ bunkering needs.

Guests from AET, Statoil, OSM Maritime Group, Samsung Shipyard, Hyundai Heavy Industries-Engine & Machinery Division, Wärtsilä Gas Systems and WinGD were on hand in Trieste, Italy, to witness the successful test of a WinGD X-DF engine running on a NG-VOC mix. Photo WinGD

WinGD X-DF Runs on NG-VOC mix

WinGD and Wärtsilä Gas Systems have tested a NG-VOC (Natural Gas - Volatile Organic Compounds) fuel mix for the WinGD X-DF engine, selected to power two 125 000 dwt Shuttle Tankers for AET. Guests from AET, Statoil, OSM Maritime Group, Samsung Shipyard and Hyundai Heavy Industries-Engine & Machinery Division were on hand in Trieste, Italy, in March, to witness the successful test of a WinGD X-DF engine running on a NG-VOC mix. The test demonstrated the engine’s capabilities under various load scenarios with up to 20% VOC in the fuel ratio.

The Exmar fleet already contains a number of VLGCs such as that pictured here. The two newbuildings will be the first to feature LpG-powered, dual-fuel MAN B&W 6G60ME-LGIP engines (Photo: MAN Diesel & Turbo)

First LPG-powered Dual-fuel VLGCs Ordered

Shipbuilder Hanjin Heavy Industries announced it will construct two 80,000 m3 very large gas carriers (VLGC) at its Philippines facilities for Belgian integrated gas shipping company EXMAR. Upon construction, the carriers will be chartered by Statoil. The newbuildings will each be powered by an individual MAN B&W 6G60ME-LGIP Mk9.5 engine. MAN Diesel & Turbo reports liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) was chosen as a fuel option so the vessels will comply with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) sulphur-emission legislation due to enter force in 2020.

Photo: MAN Diesel & Turbo

HHI to Build First LPG-Powered Dual-Fuel Engine VLGC

Hanjin Heavy Industries (HHI) has announced that it will construct  two Very Large Gas Carriers (VLGCs) in their Philippines Facilities for EXMAR, the Belgian integrated gas shipping company. The 80,000 m3 newbuildings will each be powered by an individual MAN B&W 6G60ME-LGIP Mk9.5 engine. MAN Diesel & Turbo reports that the VLGCs have chosen LPG as a fuel option so they can comply with the new IMO sulphur-emission legislation due to enter force in 2020. Engine delivery to the yard has been scheduled for December 2019. Upon construction, the carriers will be chartered by Statoil.

Image: Seacor

For Hire: Battery Hybrid PSVs

Systems integrator and equipment maker Rolls-Royce has quietly been adding hybridizing energy-storage packages to a diverse list of vessels. Yet, so, too, has one of its clients — Louisiana-based SEACOR Marine, as it reacts early to tightened emissions and energy-management standards, or EMS, for vessels plying Europe and North America. Fuel savings and energy-company clients seeking green credentials are, it turns out, just part of the upside driving battery retrofits.The fuel savings to be had for keeping thrusters on battery power are a powerful selling point, to be sure.

Photo GONDAN

European Built Dual Fuel Tug Launched

The third dual fueled tug ever built in Europe – the last of a series of three currently under construction at Gondan for the Norwegian shipowner Østensjø Rederi – has been launched at Gondan Shipyard in Figueras. The launching event was attended by representatives from the ship owner, from the charterer of the vessels – Statoil – and from the Canadian designer Robert Allan Ltd. This new escort tug, with 40.2 meters length and 16 meters beam, will provide tug services to Norwegian state-owned energy company Statoil, at the far-north terminal located at Melkøya.

(Image: Rolls-Royce)

Ship Intelligence 101

The Rolls-Royce portfolio of equipment and services extends well beyond the engine room, leveraging decades of experience in myriad business sectors. The words ‘Rolls-Royce’ can roll right off your tongue, and when they do, the average person in the maritime space probably thinks first of big, powerful, and environmentally-correct marine engines. That might have rung true just two decades ago, but today, that visual doesn’t give justice to what the firm has evolved to become. That’s also where Jay McFadyen, Rolls-Royce Senior Vice President for Ship Intelligence, comes in.