Monday, December 16, 2019

Svalbard And Jan Mayen News

Longyearbyen is the largest town in Svalbard and may become one of the first large scale consumers of green hydrogen or ammonia produced from wind farms in Finnmark. Photo credit Visit Svalbard.

"Green" Ammonia's Future as a Marine Fuel

Ammonia, the same pungent solution used in fertilizers and cleaning agents, may one day be the key to transporting renewable energy around the world. There are currently a number of government and corporate projects assessing the feasibility of converting excess renewable energy from sources like wind, solar, tidal and nuclear into ammonia and then back into usable energy.In its purist form, ammonia or NH3 is composed of one nitrogen and three hydrogen atoms making it an ideal candidate to chemically bind excess renewable energy.

Norwegian Coast Guard vessel KV Svalbard and its crew at the North Pole: the ship is the first ABB Azipod powered craft to reach the Pole. (Photo: ABB)

ABB Propulsion Takes Ship to North Pole

Norwegian Coast Guard ship KV Svalbard is the first vessel powered by an ABB Azipod propulsion system to reach the North Pole.The ship is equipped with twin 5MW Azipod icebreaking units which enabled it to sail through polar ice at speeds of up to 6 to 7 knots when it took part in an international scientific expedition, the Coordinated Arctic Acoustic Thermometry Experiment led by Norwegian research foundation The Nansen Center.The Azipod electric propulsion system is designed to make s ships highly maneuverable…

The vessel at the North Pole (CREDIT Norwegian Coast Guard)

ABB Azipod Powered Vessel Reaches North Pole

Norwegian Coast Guard’s vessel KV Svalbard was on an international environmental research expedition when it became the first ever Azipod-powered ship to reach the North Pole.With its superior performance in the harshest of ice conditions, Azipod propulsion has become an industry standard for icegoing vessels, enabling vessels to cross the Northern Sea route independently. In late August 2019, Azipod propulsion has made history, driving a Norwegian Coast Guard icebreaker all the way to the North Pole.

Renderings of a bulk carrier for the transportation of liquefied hydrogen by Moss Maritime, Wilhelmsen Ship Management, Equinor, and DNV-GL. Photo credit: Moss Maritime.

IMO2020: The Rise of Bulk Liquid Hydrogen in Norway

Imagine a power distribution network where excess renewable energy from hydropower, wind, solar, and nuclear energy is converted to hydrogen and used as transportation fuel in the maritime industry. With the allure of a zero emissions fuel, a number of ship owners are starting to seriously consider hydrogen for newly built vessels. As a bold first step, the country of Norway has provided a number of grants to leading maritime companies to conduct feasibility studies into various aspects of this emerging technology sector.

MS Roald Amundsen sailing on battery power. Photo: Hurtigruten

First Battery Powered Cruise Ship Underway

Hurtigruten’s hybrid powered MS Roald Amundsen makes maritime history as the first cruise ship in the world to sail purely on battery power.The moment – when the brand new expedition cruise ship moved through the water silent and completely emission free, powered by her large battery packs only - was captured off the west coast of Norway.Specially designed for some of the most spectacular waters of the planet, MS Roald Amundsen features groundbreaking green technology such as…

MS Roald Amundsen undergoing sea trials in the waters off Kleven Yard in Norway. Photo: UAVPIC.COM/Tor Erik Kvalsvik/Kleven/Hurtigruten

World First: Hybrid Cruise Ship Completes Sea Trial

Hurtigruten’s MS Roald Amundsen is nearing completion at Kleven Yard. This weekend the world’s first hybrid powered cruise ship completed her first sea trials in the fjords along the western coast of Norway.With Norwegian fjords as testing ground – and the famous Sunnmøre alps as a spectacular backdrop – MS Roald Amundsen’s advanced, green technology was put to a test in the waters off Kleven Yard in Ulsteinvik, Norway, over the weekend.Custom built for some of the most extreme waters on the planet…

The first of Hurtigruten’s new hybrid powered expedition cruise vessels, the MS Roald Amundsen, under construction at the Kleven Yard in Ulsteinvik, Norway: delivery is expected in May 2019. (Photo: Tom Mulligan)

Shipbuilding: Hurtigruten Hybrid Construction Forges Ahead

Norwegian company Hurtigruten, the world’s largest expedition cruise operator, is continuing to push the boundaries when it comes to green travel with its order for three hybrid-powered vessels nearing completion, the first ship being due for delivery in May 2019.Two of these revolutionary ships are currently under construction at the Kleven Yard in Ulsteinvik, Norway, the MS Roald Amundsen and its sister ship, the MS Fritjof Nansen, both of which are custom-designed to cope with some of the most extreme conditions seen on our planet, each having a specially-designed, ice-strengthened hull.

(File photo: Rolls-Royce)

Rotten Fish to Help Power Hurtigruten Cruise Ships

The Nordic region's most high-profile cruise fleet operator is refitting its ships to make them less polluting, and plans to use a byproduct of rotten fish to help power their new, leaner engines.Norway's Hurtigruten, best known for the ships that ferry tourists along the country's fjords and coastline and up into the Arctic, is investing 7 billion crowns ($826 million) over three years to adapt its 17-strong fleet.Six of its older vessels will be retrofitted to run on a combination of liquefied natural gas (LNG)…

Photo: HURTIGRUTEN

Hurtigruten Orders New Hybrid Powered Expedition Ship

Hurtigruten continues to push the borders for green travel – and orders new, groundbreaking hybrid powered expedition cruise ship.Hurtigruten, an expedition cruise operator, has signed a memorandum of understanding with Norway’s Kleven Verft AS for the construction of their third hybrid powered expedition cruise ship.The new ship’s design, construction, engineering and advanced technology will be based on Hurtigruten’s two next-generation ships, MS Roald Amundsen and MS Fridtjof Nansen…

Photo: IMO

IMO Moves toward Phase out of HFO in the Arctic

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC70) meeting brought progress by member countries toward a phase out of the use of heavy fuel oil (HFO) by vessels operating in the Arctic. Heavy fuel oil (HFO) breaks down extremely slowly in cold Arctic waters and is very difficult clean up in the event of a spill. While HFO powers some 44 percent of the ships currently operating in the Arctic, it accounts for more than 75 percent of the fuel onboard those ships, according to ICCT figures.