Tuesday, August 21, 2018

United Nations News

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Cargill Aims to Cut Ship Emissions 15% by 2020

Cargill Inc aims to cut carbon emissions from its international shipping unit by as much as 15 percent by 2020, to meet U.N. regulations to reduce pollution and demands from some of its food manufacturer customers for more environmentally-friendly operations.The global commodities trader, which was scheduled to announce the emissions goal late on Monday, told Reuters the reduction of CO2 per cargo-ton-mile was targeted at its time-chartered fleet. But overall, Cargill plans to cut total greenhouse gas emissions on an absolute basis across all company operations by 10 percent by 2025.Cargill…

Photo: GE

Innovation Paving the Way for Marine Industry in 2016

From the price of oil to environmental regulation, 2015 was a year of turmoil and uncertainty for the marine sector. Despite this, there were some common global trends that will define 2016. In December 2015, world leaders met at the COP21 conference to discuss climate change. The event’s outcome marks a decisive move towards a low carbon future focused on achieving the agreed-upon world target of 1.5 degree climate change ceiling. Indeed, despite being the most carbon-efficient form of commercial transport[1]…

Damen EcoLiner (Photo: Damen)

First LNG-powered EcoLiner Launched

Damen Shipyards Group launched the first LNG-powered Damen EcoLiner inland shipping tanker at its Romanian yard in early February. The EcoLiner, developed to deliver fuel economy for inland shipping operators while at the same time cutting emissions, features a design that combines conventional, proven engineering with sustainable innovations, including the world’s first installations of the ACES Air-Lubricated Hull, a gas-electrical shaft propulsion system and one of the first Van der Velden FLEX Tunnel installations. According to Damen, the pioneering vessel reduces fuel costs by up to 25%.

Photo: ICS

ICS Chairman Outlines Plan for CO2 Reduction

Esben Poulsson, Chairman of the International Chamber of Shipping, has set out what the industry would like the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to achieve as part of its CO2 reduction strategy for the shipping sector. Speaking at The Economist’s World Ocean Summit in Indonesia, Poulsson said that unless IMO makes significant progress the industry could be vulnerable to regional action, not only from the EU – which is considering incorporating shipping into the EU Emissions Trading System – but also from Canada or California, which have already introduced carbon pricing.

MV Argo Merchant was a Liberian-flagged oil tanker that ran aground and sank southeast of Nantucket Island, Mass., on Dec. 15, 1976, causing one of the largest marine oil spills in history. U.S. Coast Guard Archives

Disasters at Sea & Their Impact on Shipping Regulation

The history of marine safety is soaked in water and written in blood. “I think that most people will tell you that changes in marine safety are almost exclusively disaster-driven,” agrees Dr. Josh Smith, a professor at Kings Point and interim director of the American Merchant Marine Museum. It hasn’t always been that way. Actually, it’s been worse. Despite some efforts early on to exert some control over shipping practices, going to sea has been accepted as a risky undertaking as long as man has floated vessels.

The French worldwide shipping lines CMA-CGM berthed at Aden Container Terminal. Photo by Yemen Gulf of Aden Ports Corporation

Ships, Tankers Diverting from Yemen

With violent conflicts and fighting continue at most Yemeni ports, shipping lines are pulling away from the country that’s devolved into chaos in past weeks. A report in Reuters, quoting industry sources and ship tracking data, says that at least four oil and natural gas tankers that were headed to Yemen have been diverted as chaos mounts in the country after the launch of Saudi-led air strikes last month. Warships from the Saudi-led coalition have blocked a vessel carrying more than 47…

Photo: IMO

IMO’s MEPC Set to Adopt Polar Code Provisions

The Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) meets for its 68th session from May 11-15, 2015, at IMO Headquarters in London. Items on the agenda include the proposed adoption of the environmental part of the Polar Code and associated draft MARPOL amendments to make the Code mandatory; the implementation of the Ballast Water Management Convention; further work on air pollution and energy efficiency measures; and a proposal to extend the Great Barrier Reef and Torres Strait Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) to parts of the Coral Sea.

Photo: IMO

Pacific Nations Take a Stand on Shipping Emissions

On Earth Day, Pacific leaders queued among 175 countries to sign the Paris Agreement in New York. Earlier that day in London, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC)’s sister UN specialized agency, met to discuss shipping’s “fair share” in reducing greenhouse gases in a far less publicized and not nearly as successful climate change debate. Pacific and European nations have been pressing the IMO since before Paris to join the “coalition of higher ambition”.

The IGF Code, which will become mandatory under amendments to SOLAS, aims to minimize the risk to the ship, its crew and the environment, having regard to the nature of the fuels involved. (Photo:: FJORD LINE ESPEN GEES)

IMO Adopts Gas and Low-flashpoint Fuels Code

The new mandatory code for ships fuelled by gases or other low-flashpoint fuels was adopted by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), when it met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 95th session from June 3-12, 2015. The Committee also placed unsafe mixed migration by sea on its agenda and considered cyber security matters and passenger ship safety. It adopted new ships’ routing measures and approved a number of circulars arising from items put forward by the subcommittees.

Shell Mulls Refinery Upgrade to Meet 2020 Sulphur Rules

Royal Dutch Shell is considering expanding the capacity of one of its German refineries to make oil products that meet an upcoming cap on the sulphur content of fuels used in shipping. In the past few days, Rheinland refinery representatives met local officials and environmental groups to present preliminary plans for an investment at the plant's 140,000-barrels-per-day Wesseling site, Shell said on the refinery's website. Shell is considering "a modernization of the residue processing unit at Rheinland refinery and to enhance the desulphurisation plant there"…

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Economic Sustainability is Key to Green Shipping -ICS

Addressing government trade negotiators in the OECD Working Party on Shipbuilding at a workshop on “green growth” in Paris, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) asserted that the shipping industry could only be environmentally sustainable if it is economically sustainable too. “The perennial challenge facing ship owners is overcapacity, aided and abetted by government subsidies and support measures that encourage shipyards to produce ships that are surplus to requirements,” said ICS Director of Policy, Simon Bennett.

MSC Approves SOLAS Amendments

The International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), which met at the Organization's London headquarters for its 94th session, from November 17-21, 2014, approved draft SOLAS amendments to make mandatory the International Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low- flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code); adopted other SOLAS amendments; continued its work on its action plan on passenger ship safety; and approved and adopted a number of items put forward by the subcommittees.

Representatives from IMO, the lead pilot countries and Singapore at the GloMEEP launch (Photo: IMO)

IMO Launches Low-carbon Project: GloMEEP

The Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships Project (GloMEEP), which aims to support increased uptake and implementation of energy-efficiency measures for shipping, was formally launched on Monday, September 28, in Singapore, at the IMO-Singapore Future-Ready Shipping 2015 conference. This Global Environment Facility (GEF)/United Nations Development Program (UNDP)/IMO project, formally designated “Transforming the Global Maritime Transport Industry towards a Low Carbon Future through Improved Energy Efficiency”…

File photo: Robert Hendry

IMO Sets Regulations to Cut SOx Emissions from 2020

The United Nations' shipping agency on Thursday set global regulations to limit the amount of sulphur emissions from vessels which will come into force from 2020. The shipping industry is by far the world's biggest emitter of sulphur, with the sulphur oxide content in heavy fuel oil up to 3,500 times higher than the latest European diesel standards for vehicles.

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IMO Reaches Deal to Cut CO2 Emissions

The United Nations shipping agency reached an agreement on Friday to cut carbon emissions, following years of slow progress. The compromise plan, which will cut emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels, fell short of more ambitious targets. Kitack Lim, Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), said the adoption of the strategy "would allow future IMO work on climate change to be rooted in a solid basis". The IMO said it would also be pursuing efforts towards phasing out CO2 emissions entirely.

File Image: A recent LNG bunkering operation in progress (CREDIT: Nauticor)

LNG as a Fuel Won't Meet Strict Carbon Regulations - analyst

Switching to liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel ocean-going vessels may not be enough for shippers to comply with long-term emissions regulations and they will have to find additional ways of reducing emissions, JBC Energy said on Tuesday. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) on Friday reached an agreement to cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels. Shipping accounts for 2.2 percent of world CO2 emissions, according to the IMO, the United Nations agency responsible for regulating the shipping industry.

GloMEEP Georgia workshop Courtesy IMO

GloMEEP Energy Efficiency Project Gets Underway

The first national workshop under the Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships GloMEEP), Project, which aims to support increased uptake and implementation of energy-efficiency measures for shipping, has been held in Georgia. Georgia is one of the Lead Pilot Countries for the project, which aims to build understanding and knowledge of technical and operational energy-efficiency measures to lead maritime transport into a low-carbon future. The national workshop in Batumi…

(Photo: Tuukka Ervasti)

Viking Line: Using Wind Power to Cut Ship Emissions

As the commercial maritime community is collectively pressed by international and regional regulation to cut emissions, news today from Viking Line proves action as Viking Grace -- which is already fueled by LNG -- has become the first passenger ship in the world to use a rotor sail for wind-assisted propulsion. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations shipping arm, agreed in mid-April to cut carbon emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 as compared to 2008 levels, and is a continuation of the push for decarbonization in the Maritime Sector.