Monday, November 18, 2019

United Nations News

File Image: A typical Maersk boxship works cargo alongside a pier. (CREDIT: Maersk)

The Quest to Develop IMO 2020 'bio' Fuels

Top shipping, retail and transport companies are looking to develop an alternative marine fuel which aims to reduce carbon emissions from ships, in another step to push the sector to go green.International shipping accounts for 2.2% of global carbon dioxide emissions, according to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), more than aviation's 2% share.The IMO, a United Nations agency, has said it aims to halve greenhouse gas emissions from 2008 levels by 2050.Investor and activist pressure is prompting companies to look to speed up reducing the industry's carbon footprint.Denmark's A.P.

Photo: IMO

EU/IMO Global Project Drives Energy Efficiency

The GMN global network of maritime technology cooperation centers has completed numerous pilot projects over the past three years, helping to drive forward the changes which are required to reduce GHG emissions from shipping. A global network of maritime technology cooperation centers has completed an impressive array of pilot projects over the past three years, helping to drive forward the changes which are required to reduce GHG emissions from shipping.Five regional Maritime…

Pic:  International Maritime Organization (IMO)

BWM Convention Modification Enter into Force

The amendments to an international treaty aimed at preventing the spread of potentially invasive species in ships’ ballast water came into force yesterday (October 13), the International Maritime Organization (IMO) said.Ships regularly take on sea water, in tanks, to ensure their stability. Known as ballast water, this can contain many aquatic species, including in microscopic or larval form. These can become invasive and harmful if the ballast water is released, unmanaged, in…

 Image: Bloom Energy

Bloom Energy, Samsung to Design Electric Ships

California-based Bloom Energy, the provider of stationary fuel cells, has announced a collaboration with South Korean shipbuilder Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI), to design and develop ships powered by Bloom Energy’s solid oxide fuel cell technology.SHI aims to be the first shipbuilder to deliver a large cargo ship for ocean operation powered by fuel cells running on natural gas. Such an innovation will play a key role in helping the company exceed the 50 percent emissions reduction target…

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Dry Freight Rates Buoyed by Scrubber Refit Work

With the world's largest dry cargo ships coming out of service for refits to comply with tougher rules on emissions, charter rates are expected to remain strong, a top Cargill executive said, after posting 7-fold gains already this year."There are a lot of ships - especially on the capesizes - that will go into scrubber fitting which basically means they will be out of service for at least 25 days each to do so," Jan Dieleman, president of trading firm Cargill's ocean transportation business…

Concept illustration of a push boat powered by fuel cell system (Image: ABB)

World-First: Hydrogen-powered Push Boat

A new vessel being built to operate along the Rhône river in France will be the world's first push boat to run entirely on hydrogen fuel cells.The newbuild for the France-based Sogestran Group subsidiary Compagnie Fluviale de Transport (CFT) is due for delivery in 2021 and will feature a fuel cell based power and propulsion solution from ABB through its role in FLAGSHIPS, the EU-funded initiative to deploy commercially operated zero-emission vessels for inland and short sea operations.

File Image: AdobeStock / © 14KT Gold

Marine Fuel Rules to Disrupt Markets for 1-5 years

The marine industry's January 2020 shift to using very low sulfur fuel oil (VLSFO) to power ships worldwide will launch a one- to five-year disruption in oil and refined products markets, according to a study released Thursday by Boston Consulting Group.The International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s mandated switch will require fuels to have a sulfur content below 0.5%, compared with 3.5% now. It aims to improve human health by reducing air pollution from sea-going vessels.The changeover may increase profits for refiners, especially on the U.S.

Image Credit: Maid of the Mist Corp.

All-Electric: ABB Powers Niagara Tourist Boats

Niagara Falls tour operator Maid of the Mist orders two new passenger vessels sailing on pure electric power, enabled by ABB’s technologyVisitors to the iconic Niagara Falls will soon be able to experience one of the USA’s top landmarks emission-free. Two new Maid of the Mist passenger vessels will be powered entirely by high-capacity battery packs, becoming the first all-electric vessels ever built in the US.The new vessels will benefit from ABB’s zero-emission technology when they start operating later this year…

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No Delays to Implementing 2020 Sulphur Cap -IMO Official

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) will not delay implementing a reduction in the amount of sulphur in marine fuel in 2020, an IMO official said on Tuesday."I can categorically say there will not be a delay," said Edmund Hughes, the head of air pollution and energy efficiency at the IMO, during the Asia Pacific Petroleum Conference (APPEC) in Singapore.IMO, the United Nations' shipping agency, will require that vessels start in 2020 using fuel oil with 0.5 percent sulphur…

(Photo: Odfjell)

Odfjell Says It Will Not Install Scrubbers

Chemical tanker firm Odfjell said it will not invest in scrubbers to clean fuel on its vessels to comply with new stricter emission rules from 2020 but instead buy fuel which meets the new standards.To combat air pollution, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations' shipping agency, has set global regulations to cap the sulphur content in marine fuel, known as bunkers, at 0.5 percent, down from 3.5 percent now.Shipowners can either install scrubbers, which clean the cheaper high sulphur fuel oil, or buy costlier marine gasoil."Our conclusion for the moment is that it do

(File photo: Maersk Line)

Maersk to Install Scrubbers on Select Vessels Ahead of 2020

A.P. Moller-Maersk, the world's biggest container shipping group, will add devices to reduce harmful exhaust emissions to some of its ships ahead of new global fuel regulations starting in 2020.To combat air pollution, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations' shipping agency, has set global regulations to cap the sulphur content in marine fuels, known as bunkers, at 0.5 percent down from 3.5 percent now.Shipowners could meet the new regulations by installing sulphur-stripping exhaust cleaning systems…

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Cargill Aims to Cut Ship Emissions 15% by 2020

Cargill Inc aims to cut carbon emissions from its international shipping unit by as much as 15 percent by 2020, to meet U.N. regulations to reduce pollution and demands from some of its food manufacturer customers for more environmentally-friendly operations.The global commodities trader, which was scheduled to announce the emissions goal late on Monday, told Reuters the reduction of CO2 per cargo-ton-mile was targeted at its time-chartered fleet. But overall, Cargill plans to cut total greenhouse gas emissions on an absolute basis across all company operations by 10 percent by 2025.Cargill…

(Photo: Tuukka Ervasti)

Viking Line: Using Wind Power to Cut Ship Emissions

As the commercial maritime community is collectively pressed by international and regional regulation to cut emissions, news today from Viking Line proves action as Viking Grace -- which is already fueled by LNG -- has become the first passenger ship in the world to use a rotor sail for wind-assisted propulsion. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), the United Nations shipping arm, agreed in mid-April to cut carbon emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 as compared to 2008 levels, and is a continuation of the push for decarbonization in the Maritime Sector.

Photo: ICS

ICS Chairman Outlines Plan for CO2 Reduction

Esben Poulsson, Chairman of the International Chamber of Shipping, has set out what the industry would like the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to achieve as part of its CO2 reduction strategy for the shipping sector. Speaking at The Economist’s World Ocean Summit in Indonesia, Poulsson said that unless IMO makes significant progress the industry could be vulnerable to regional action, not only from the EU – which is considering incorporating shipping into the EU Emissions Trading System – but also from Canada or California, which have already introduced carbon pricing.

Shell Mulls Refinery Upgrade to Meet 2020 Sulphur Rules

Royal Dutch Shell is considering expanding the capacity of one of its German refineries to make oil products that meet an upcoming cap on the sulphur content of fuels used in shipping. In the past few days, Rheinland refinery representatives met local officials and environmental groups to present preliminary plans for an investment at the plant's 140,000-barrels-per-day Wesseling site, Shell said on the refinery's website. Shell is considering "a modernization of the residue processing unit at Rheinland refinery and to enhance the desulphurisation plant there"…

© Gary Blakeley / Adobe Stock

Economic Sustainability is Key to Green Shipping -ICS

Addressing government trade negotiators in the OECD Working Party on Shipbuilding at a workshop on “green growth” in Paris, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) asserted that the shipping industry could only be environmentally sustainable if it is economically sustainable too. “The perennial challenge facing ship owners is overcapacity, aided and abetted by government subsidies and support measures that encourage shipyards to produce ships that are surplus to requirements,” said ICS Director of Policy, Simon Bennett.

© Kara  / Adobe Stock

IMO Reaches Deal to Cut CO2 Emissions

The United Nations shipping agency reached an agreement on Friday to cut carbon emissions, following years of slow progress. The compromise plan, which will cut emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels, fell short of more ambitious targets. Kitack Lim, Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), said the adoption of the strategy "would allow future IMO work on climate change to be rooted in a solid basis". The IMO said it would also be pursuing efforts towards phasing out CO2 emissions entirely.

File Image: A recent LNG bunkering operation in progress (CREDIT: Nauticor)

LNG as a Fuel Won't Meet Strict Carbon Regulations - analyst

Switching to liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel ocean-going vessels may not be enough for shippers to comply with long-term emissions regulations and they will have to find additional ways of reducing emissions, JBC Energy said on Tuesday. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) on Friday reached an agreement to cut carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by at least 50 percent by 2050 compared with 2008 levels. Shipping accounts for 2.2 percent of world CO2 emissions, according to the IMO, the United Nations agency responsible for regulating the shipping industry.